Class crisis

India needs a better education system—both as an emerging economy as well as a vibrant democracy—but the government does not seem to understand the enormity of the challenge


The only response over the past decade has been a draconian right to education law that does more to shut private schools than reform pedagogy. Photo: Mint
The only response over the past decade has been a draconian right to education law that does more to shut private schools than reform pedagogy. Photo: Mint

A Bihari topper claims political science teaches how to cook. Her Gujarati peers think a triangle has four sides. And now an economics professor in Uttar Pradesh does not know what the International Monetary Fund is.

These examples would be hilarious if they weren’t so common.

Several surveys over recent years have shown that school students learn very little. Teachers rarely come to class. The rich have exited this broken system. Those who have no option are trapped.

The only response over the past decade has been a draconian right to education law that does more to shut private schools than reform pedagogy.

There are no easy solutions. Everything from higher budgetary outlays to education vouchers to online education has been discussed.

India needs a better education system—both as an emerging economy as well as a vibrant democracy.

The government, however, does not seem to understand the enormity of the challenge India is confronting.

READ MORE