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Quick Edit | Tax returns on Twitter

Quick Edit | Tax returns on Twitter
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First Published: Thu, Jul 08 2010. 11 32 PM IST
Updated: Thu, Jul 08 2010. 11 32 PM IST
Savvy politicians are no strangers to Twitter and Facebook, using it for their own political ends. This week, the Philippines’ new government is turning to social networking, using it to some serious social and economic ends for the country.
When most nations are fretting about their fiscal deficits, Manila thinks it’s figured out a new way to bridge the gap: enlisting Twitter and Facebook to boost tax collections.
Honest citizens can complain about tax evasion and corruption, posting on Facebook or Twitter when they smell a tax cheat. Filipinos are among the most prolific users of social networking and text messaging in Asia.
We wonder if this would work in India. This is not just growing to be the land of enthusiastic tweeters, but also the very land of tax evaders and Swiss bank account holders (if we believe the 2009 general election). But are Indians morally outraged enough about cheating the government that they start telling on their neighbours?
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First Published: Thu, Jul 08 2010. 11 32 PM IST
More Topics: Quick Edit | Twitter | Facebook | Tax | Philippines |