Pakistan’s Dangerous Anti-American Game

Pakistan’s Dangerous Anti-American Game
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First Published: Thu, May 31 2012. 08 47 PM IST

Pakistani doctor Shakil Afrid (Reuters)
Pakistani doctor Shakil Afrid (Reuters)
Updated: Thu, May 31 2012. 08 47 PM IST
Last week a Pakistani court sentenced Shakil Afridi—the doctor who helped the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) track Osama bin Laden last year—to 33 years in prison after he was accused of treason or possible ties with militants. In response, the US Congress docked a symbolic $33 million from Pakistan’s annual aid budget, or $1 million for every year of the doctor’s sentence.
Pakistani doctor Shakil Afrid (Reuters)
US anger is understandable. In the year since Osama was discovered in the garrison town of Abbottabad, Pakistan has done little to dispel the widespread belief that the world’s most wanted terrorist was sheltered by elements in the country’s army and its spy agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). Nobody has been punished for aiding bin Laden. Neither has the rogue nuclear weapons scientist A.Q. Khan nor Hafiz Muhammad Saeed, of the terrorist group Lashkar-e-Taiba.
Click here to read the full column.
The Wall Street Journal
Sadanand Dhume is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a columnist for WSJ.com
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First Published: Thu, May 31 2012. 08 47 PM IST
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