Talking point

Talking point
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First Published: Thu, Mar 13 2008. 12 06 AM IST

Ajay Gupta is CEO of ruralnaukri.com. Send your career queries to askmint@livemint.com
Ajay Gupta is CEO of ruralnaukri.com. Send your career queries to askmint@livemint.com
Updated: Thu, Mar 13 2008. 12 07 AM IST
Ajay Gupta is CEO of ruralnaukri.com. Send your career queries to askmint@livemint.com
With the economy growing at a robust pace, employment opportunities are multiplying, particularly in the rural sector, with companies focusing on the untapped potential there. Mint presents a fortnightly column on jobs and careers.
I am currently a part of senior management of a large government organization that offers agricultural services on a pan-India basis. I have received an offer to head a small, new company that is into agri-inputs. What should I do?
The decision to shift depends on several factors. You must, however, keep in mind that shifting to start-ups usually carries a fair amount of risk. To be successful in any new business, irrespective of the market potential, is a function of many factors.
Also, it must be borne in mind that the agri-inputs industry currently is not witnessing high growth rates, margins are low, competition is fierce and it has faced a talent exodus during the last two years, and thus getting good people remains a challenge.
However, if you feel confident of surviving all these pressures, it could be an opportunity to lead an organization and display your strengths. In case you are inclined to make this shift, you may like to gather information on the financial standing as well as market reputation of the promoters of the new company.
Also, you may like to cover the risk by either seeking some agreement on bonus (six-eight months’ salary) and/or a substantial raise in salary. Another emerging trend is to have a severance clause included in the letter of appointment. This clause suggests that in the event the company severs ties with you for any reason, the company is liable to pay you damages of some mutually agreed amount.
I am a top-rank executive in a large Indian company. I want to make a switch to a more challenging assignment. However, my high salary package is working against me as I tend to be out of reach for most companies. How can I plan a shift?
Many companies tend to create exit barriers for their employees by offering compensation that is difficult to match. At this juncture, you need to list your priorities. In case money is not the first, second or third priority and job challenge, creativity, desire to do something different, etc. have taken over the mechanical tendency of making money, you need to communicate this thought to the prospective employers well in advance.
This communication is likely to prevent the conventional thought process and may open the way for a further discussion to assess your suitability for the role in consideration. You need to take precautions that such a communication does not lead to an impression that you are being asked to quit or are under pressure to do so due to non-performance.
Hence, your pre-emptive exchange of ideas should also include your recent achievements. Assuming that the need for sufficient savings buffer has been met, it may be a good idea not to be governed by the monetary factor and instead to exercise your choice to pick up what you would enjoy doing.
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First Published: Thu, Mar 13 2008. 12 06 AM IST
More Topics: Career | Jobs | Talent | Agriculture | Government |