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China vows to hit back if targeted by the US on yuan

China vows to hit back if targeted by the US on yuan
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First Published: Sun, Mar 21 2010. 09 38 PM IST

Unrelenting: Chinese minister for commerce says currency is a sovereign issue and should not be discussed with the US. Nelson Ching / Bloomberg
Unrelenting: Chinese minister for commerce says currency is a sovereign issue and should not be discussed with the US. Nelson Ching / Bloomberg
Updated: Sun, Mar 21 2010. 09 38 PM IST
Beijing: Beijing will retaliate if the US declares China a currency manipulator and imposes trade sanctions, commerce minister Chen Deming said, firing the latest salvo in a spat over the value of the yuan.
Chen again accused the US of politicizing the issue ahead of the 15 April deadline for the US treasury to rule whether China is unfairly holding down its exchange rate to gain a competitive edge in global markets.
Unrelenting: Chinese minister for commerce says currency is a sovereign issue and should not be discussed with the US. Nelson Ching / Bloomberg
“The currency is a sovereign issue and should not be an issue to be discussed between two countries,” Chen said.
“We think the renminbi is not undervalued, but if the US treasury gave an untrue reply for its own needs, we will wait and see. If such a reply is followed by trade sanctions, I think we will not do nothing. We will also respond if this means litigation under the global legal framework,” he added. Chen did not specify how Beijing might respond.
Political pressure is growing in Washington to declare China a currency manipulator, with some US senators threatening to slap duties on Chinese products if Beijing does not allow the yuan, also known as the renminbi, to rise.
The head of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) on Sunday joined the chorus of calls for Beijing to abandon the peg of 6.83 yuan to the dollar imposed in mid-2008 to help China’s exporters weather the global financial crisis.
In the three years before that, Beijing had let the yuan climb 21% against the dollar.
“Greater flexibility in the exchange rate of the yuan would be in the interests of the Chinese economy. Rebalancing is a big challenge and exchange-rate flexibility could contribute to making that process smoother over the years to come,” ADB president Haruhiko Kuroda said.
While it was wrong to rely exclusively on the exchange rate to tilt the economy away from exports and towards consumption, a freer-floating yuan would also strengthen Beijing’s control over monetary policy, Kuroda said.
“When and how should be decided by the Chinese authorities,” he said of the switch back to a more flexible currency regime.
The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank both urged China last week to let the yuan resume its ascent.
Some US legislators and think tanks say the Chinese currency is undervalued by as much as 40%, causing imbalances in bilateral and global trade flows.
But Chen accused Washington of overestimating the size of China’s trade surplus with the US, putting more pressure on the relationship between the world’s biggest and third biggest economies.
The defiant comments stood in contrast to a ministry statement on Friday that was widely interpreted as an attempt to bridge differences.
The ministry said then that it would send a vice minister to Washington this week to try to ease trade frictions, although it specifically noted that China’s currency policy was off-limits.
Alan Wheatley contributed to this story.
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First Published: Sun, Mar 21 2010. 09 38 PM IST
More Topics: China | US | Yuan | Currency | Chen Deming |