Talking Point

Talking Point
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First Published: Wed, May 07 2008. 10 37 PM IST
Updated: Wed, May 07 2008. 10 37 PM IST
With the economy growing at a robust pace, employment opportunities are multiplying, particularly in the rural sector, with companies focusing on the untapped potential there. Mint presents a fortnightly column on job prospects in the sector.
I am currently taking the final year examination in commerce stream. Please advise me how to make a career in agribusiness, an area of my interest. I have been an average-plus student and expect 60% marks in graduation.
You happen to be at a crucial point and strategies applied at this stage are likely to play a key role in deciding your career path. To create a strong pitch for yourself, plan to acquire relevant education in this exciting domain. As most of the entrance exams for admission to the session starting in July are over, you may like to work in any agribusiness organization for the next one year. Kindly note that this experience should preferably be in a large agribusiness organization as your future resume should contain only names of reputed companies and known institutions. Simultaneously, you may need to invest about two hours every day to prepare for admission tests held by premier rural management institutions. Your one year’s work experience will yield due returns in case you happen to appear in any of the interviews for selection to the management programme. As a back-up plan, you must also appear in entrance examinations of general management institutes. During the preparatory year, it may be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the developments in this happening sector. This will act as a motivating force and could impress the interview panels for an admission, or a job.
I completed my postgraduation in rural management from a premier institute about seven years back and am thinking of undertaking further education from the Indian School of Business (ISB), Hyderabad. Is it likely to be useful for career growth?
The Indian School of Business (ISB) offers world-class education. The return on investment made in terms of time, finances and efforts is expected to be attractive enough to avail the opportunity. You may compare your career progression vis-a-vis any of your friends, who may not have undertaken a management course. In a similar manner, education from ISB is likely to provide you a second opportunity to leapfrog several career levels over one year. Hence, the proposed second MBA appears to be a preferred choice for you, should family circumstances permit.
I am a 26-year-old, New Delhi-based chartered accountant and work as an assistant accounts manager in a multinational company. I am inclined to take up a part-time MBA course. Kindly advise.
Your first choice should be a full-time MBA from a category A institute. In case this is not possible, then you may choose to complete the MBA on a part-time basis from a reputed institution such as the Faculty of Management Studies, Delhi, or the Indian Institute of Foreign Trade. Also, along with an MBA, you could enrol yourself for a chartered financial accountancy (CFA) course. Please note that the chances of taking advantage of higher education progressively reduce as you grow older. It could be useful if you can wrap up both the MBA and CFA by the time you are 30 years of age.
Ajay Gupta is CEO of ruralnaukri.com. Comments and feedback is welcome at askmint@livemint.com
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First Published: Wed, May 07 2008. 10 37 PM IST