India 49th best country for youth: French think-tank

The Youthonomics Global Index 2015 ‘aims to compare the economic, social and political conditions in which youth from various countries flourish, as well as the ways in which conditions could improve”


New Delhi: In a study that aims to measure economic, social and political prosperity of youth, India has been ranked 49th out of 64 nations.

The Youthonomics Global Index 2015, essentially, “aims to compare the economic, social and political conditions in which youth from various countries flourish, as well as the ways in which conditions could improve.” It defines youth as an individual aged from 15 to 29.

According to the index, put together by Felix Marquardt and former East Timor president and Nobel peace prize laureate Jose Ramos-Horta, the best countries to be young in include Norway (1), Switzerland (2), Sweden (3), Denmark (4) and The Netherlands (5h). The worst countries, ranked right at the bottom are Cote d’Ivoire or Ivory Coast (ranked 64), South Africa (63), Mali (62), Uganda (61) and Brazil (60).

The rankings are based on what Youthonomics calls “Youth Now”, “Youth Outlook” and “Youth Optimism”.

The Youth Now sub-index is essentially a present “evaluation of the state of youth in 2015”. The sub-index is divided into six categories -- “early education”, “university and skills”, “access to employment”, “work and living conditions”, “wellbeing” and “health”.

India, with an overall score of 38.4, is ranked 53rd in the sub-index. Specifically, it is ranked 53rd in early education, 52nd in university/skills, 29th in access to employment, a lowly 61st in work and living conditions, 44th in wellbeing and 57th in health. The top five countries in this sub-index include Switzerland, The Netherlands, Norway, Austria and Germany.

Interestingly, India does well in the ‘Youth Outlook’ sub-index, finishing tenth among the 64 countries. In the ‘Public Finance’ section, which examines the “expected limitations to government spending”, India is ranked on the higher side, 19th in the world.

Likewise, in the Economic Opportunities section, which “assesses the coming economic cycle of the current youth cohort, who if not already the case, will enter the labour market in the coming years,” India is ranked a high 9th.

The other category is called “Political Weight” or what Youthonomics describes as “the existing economic and public policy bias against youth as well as the opportunity they have to articulate their interests and exert political influence to help focus state action toward a better representation of their interests.”

In this, India is ranked 24th. In the overall ‘Youth Outlook’, there are four African countries in the top 10—Uganda (2), Rwanda (4), Ghana (6) and Kenya (9).