Supreme Court allows release of Rs2.8 crore funds to BCCI

Supreme Court allowed the BCCI to utilize Rs1.33 crore for hosting two test matches in Mumbai and Chennai this month between India and England


BCCI had sought release of funds to pay player’s fee, match insurance and decision review system technology to be used to review potentially controversial umpiring decisions in the match. Photo: Aniruddha Chowdhury/Mint
BCCI had sought release of funds to pay player’s fee, match insurance and decision review system technology to be used to review potentially controversial umpiring decisions in the match. Photo: Aniruddha Chowdhury/Mint

New Delhi: The Supreme Court on Wednesday allowed release of Rs2.8 crore to the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) for conducting eight matches in different formats between India and England.

A bench led by chief justice T.S. Thakur allowed the BCCI to utilize Rs1.33 crore for hosting two test matches in Mumbai and Chennai this month. Additionally the court allowed BCCI Rs25 lakh each for three one day international matches and three T-20 matches to be played in January and February.

“File an affidavit on revenue earned from the series,” the court told BCCI.

BCCI had sought release of funds to pay player’s fee, match insurance and decision review system technology to be used to review potentially controversial umpiring decisions in the match.

Earlier in the day, senior advocate Kapil Sibal, appearing for the cricketing body had sought an urgent hearing as the test match in Mumbai is set to begin from 8 December.

On 8 November, the apex court allowed BCCI to disburse funds directly to parties, departing from the norm to make such payments through state cricket associations. On 7 October, the court had barred BCCI from disbursing funds to state bodies until they implement reforms suggested by the Lodha committee.

On 22 November, the court-appointed Lodha panel also sought to appoint former union home secretary G.K. Pillai to run BCCI, replacing the existing office bearers. The court is yet to hear the issue.

More From Livemint