Photo: Bloomberg
Photo: Bloomberg

US FDA declares Maggi safe for consumption

FDA finds 'no unsafe lead levels' in Maggi shipments from India, according to Nestle's official importer in the US

New Delhi: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared Nestle’s popular snack Maggi instant noodles, declaring it safe for human consumption, the official importer of Nestle products in the US said in a post on its official Facebook page late on Monday night.

“The US FDA has tested several shipments of Maggi noodles from India for lead content. Finding no unsafe lead levels, FDA released the noodles for sale in the United States. Therefore consumers can continue to buy Maggi noodles with confidence," House of Spices said in the post.

On 5 August, India’s food regulator Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) clarified that it has not given “any clean chit" to Nestle India Ltd regarding the safety of Maggi noodles. Earlier, on 5 June, the FSSAI had asked Nestle India to immediately withdraw all nine variants of its Maggi noodles, calling them “unsafe and hazardous" for human consumption due to presence of excess lead and misleading labelling information regarding presence of monosodium glutamate (MSG) on the packaging.

Before the US did so, the UK, Singapore, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Vietnam and Hong Kong declared Maggi noodles safe.

The ban on sales of Maggi noodles has already impacted Nestle India’s revenue. The local unit of the Swiss packaged food multinational after 15 years reported a quarterly loss—for the quarter ended 30 June 2015. Maggi noodles accounted for about 30% of its sales. Nestle India reported a loss of 64.4 crore in April-June quarter compared with a net profit of 287.86 crore in the year-ago period.

As part of its efforts to bring Maggi noodles back to shelves, Nestle has sent back Suresh Narayanan, who has been with the company since 1999, to India as its new managing director effective 1 August.

Close