OPEN APP
Home >Companies >Sanofi stops developing Glenmark drug for multiple sclerosis
Sanofi’s decision was not due to any safety concerns, said Glenmark, which will look for other partners to develop the drug after Sanofi returned the rights. Photo: Bloomberg
Sanofi’s decision was not due to any safety concerns, said Glenmark, which will look for other partners to develop the drug after Sanofi returned the rights. Photo: Bloomberg

Sanofi stops developing Glenmark drug for multiple sclerosis

Sanofi licensed vatelizumab in 2011 in a deal worth over $600 million, marking Glenmark's first licensing deal for an original product

Mumbai: French drugmaker Sanofi SA has stopped developing a potential multiple sclerosis drug licensed from India’s Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Ltd after the drug failed to reach the desired level of efficacy in a mid-stage trial.

Sanofi licensed vatelizumab in 2011 in a deal worth over $600 million, marking Glenmark’s first licensing deal for an original product. The drug was the furthest in development in Glenmark’s original-drugs pipeline.

Sanofi had been conducting Phase 2 trials for the drug as a treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. But it stopped development due to “results of a pre-planned interim analysis that revealed the primary efficacy endpoint was not met," both companies said in separate statements on Thursday.

Sanofi’s decision was not due to any safety concerns, said Glenmark, which will look for other partners to develop the drug after Sanofi returned the rights.

Glenmark is one of a small number of Indian firms developing original drugs. It is banking on its product pipeline for growth in its largest market, the United States, as the market for simple generic drugs becomes more crowded and less profitable.

Some Indian drugmakers are developing complex generics with niche applications or copies of biotech drugs, but Glenmark has focused on original products which require larger investment.

Glenmark has three other products in its original drugs pipeline, including for cancer, autoimmune diseases and chronic pain. Reuters

Subscribe to Mint Newsletters
* Enter a valid email
* Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter.

Click here to read the Mint ePaperMint is now on Telegram. Join Mint channel in your Telegram and stay updated with the latest business news.

Close
×
Edit Profile
My Reads Redeem a Gift Card Logout