A file photo shows, from left, Judith Shekoni, Tracey Heggins, Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, Christian Camargo, Peter Facinelli and Casey LaBow in a scene from the film “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2.” Photo: AP/Summit Entertainment
A file photo shows, from left, Judith Shekoni, Tracey Heggins, Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, Christian Camargo, Peter Facinelli and Casey LaBow in a scene from the film “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2.” Photo: AP/Summit Entertainment

Lions Gate to create ‘Twilight’ shorts to be shown on Facebook

The firm will hold a contest to select five women to direct the mini-movies, to be judged by Stephenie Meyer, Kristen Stewart and Kate Winslet among others

Los Angeles: The studio behind “Twilight" has teamed up with Facebook Inc. to create five short films based on the franchise.

Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., which made five full-length “Twilight" films, will hold a contest to select five women to direct the mini-movies, according to a statement. The judges will include Stephenie Meyer, who wrote the “Twilight" novels, and Kristen Stewart, who starred in the teen vampire films.

The studio is working on the project with the non-profit Women in Film, and the end products will debut on Facebook. The partnerships give Lions Gate a chance to extend its most lucrative franchise, which ended with 2012’s “The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2," which generated $829 million in global box-office receipts.

“We’re pleased to introduce fresh creative talent to the ‘Twilight’ universe as part of our commitment to female empowerment in front of and behind the camera," Lions Gate chief executive officer Jon Feltheimer and vice chairman Michael Burns said in the statement.

In addition to Meyer and Stewart, the judges include actors Kate Winslet and Octavia Spencer and Jennifer Lee, who wrote and co-directed Walt Disney Co.’s “Frozen."

“The female voice is something that has become more and more important to me as I’ve worked in the film industry," Meyer said in the statement.

Just 23% of films distributed globally from 2010 to 2013 featured female protagonists, according to a report released last week by the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media. 31% of speaking characters were women in the 120 films studied, and 8% had female directors. Bloomberg

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