New Delhi: Superhero action film A Flying Jatt, directed by Remo D’Souza and starring Tiger Shroff and Jacqueline Fernandez, could have been a rollicking entertainer, especially for children, but is let down by an unimpressive plot, says The Indian Express. The first half is not afraid to be silly and is very enjoyable, but the preachy and heavy second half goes south. Without the funny bits which kept the pre-interval parts afloat, the faults start glaring.

India Today agrees the film doesn’t really fly. If grown-ups don’t mind doing the fabled “leave the brain outside and enjoy" routine before stepping into the theatre, they will not mind this one. Stretches where it takes a dig at its own lack of seriousness are the best but otherwise the film can be exceptionally and embarrassingly unoriginal.

Director Param Gill’s Waarrior Savitri, starring Niharica Raizada, Rajat Barmecha and Om Puri, is yet another skin and sex show, says The Hindu, that too a boring rather than titillating one. This modern-day adaptation of the fable of Savitri who saved her husband Satyavan from Yamraj, the god of death, and brought him back from the throes of mortality could have been an interesting way to turn around the gender divide, role-playing and expectations. In its own clumsy way it tries to, but only initially and that too very half-heartedly.

Director Abhishek Jawkar’s thriller Missing on a Weekend, starring Pavan Malhotra and Karan Hariharan, is a placid and unexciting show all the way, says The Hindu. There are no great stylistic flourishes to enliven the predictable trajectory and the characters have little complexity.

For Hollywood fans, American action thriller Mechanic: Resurrection, directed by Dennis Gansel and starring Jason Statham, Tommy Lee Jones and Jessica Alba, comes to India this week. The problem is while Statham is doing the heavy lifting, nobody else involved in the project seems to be doing so, and once the “kill him and make it look like an accident" phase is out of the way, it all just gets a bit messy, says screengeek.net. If you’ve got a spare 90 minutes, or have a particular love of seeing henchmen murdered with firearms, fountain pens or soft furnishings, then this is worth your time. If not, it can definitely be missed.

Director Barry Sonnenfeld’s comedy Nine Lives, starring Kevin Spacey, Jennifer Garner and Robbie Amell, is made by people labouring under the delusion that an animal who talks is in itself funny, which is untrue, says Variety magazine. The film, in fact, is a lot like a cat: It occasionally bestirs itself, and it would like to be stroked with love, but mostly it just sits there. It’s a pet farce so flat it makes you long for the Lubitsch touch of the Alvin and the Chipmunks comedies.

A.V. Club calls the film an exquisite-corpse exercise in kiddie-movie plotting. As with so many movies made to low standards under the assumption that their target audience isn’t old enough to care, Nine Lives generates its own cut-rate surrealism. Very little of it makes sense, even when accounting for human-feline mind-swaps, and everything is cheap, from the recycled gags to the small, cramped sets and shortage of background extras.

Punjabi drama 25 Kille, directed by Simranjit Singh Hundal and starring Guggu Gill and Yograj Singh, is high on action but is let down by its dull romantic portions, says punjabimania.com. The screenplay and dialogues are pretty average and not too many performances hold up.

Several releases this week haven’t inspired any reviews yet. These include Tamil films 54321 and Meendum Oru Kadhal Kadhai, Telugu movie Avasaraniko Abaddam, Malayalam films Appooppanthadi, Popcorn, 168 Hours and LBW, Marathi movie Kanha and Bengali film Shaheb Bibi Golaam.

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