New Delhi: John Abraham, Varun Dhawan and Jacqueline Fernandez’s action adventure film Dishoom, directed by Rohit Dhawan, is stylish but clichéd and predictable, says Gulf News. While the first half is engaging, the second half brings alive stereotypes attached to the Middle East and is ridden with corny twists. The focus is always on the two swashbuckling heroes. But it would have been great if there was more to them than just style and swagger. Read here

Filmi Beat calls the film an entertaining watch despite a poor script and a series of loopholes in the plot. The comic chemistry between the two leads saves the day.

For Hollywood fans, American supernatural comedy Ghostbusters, directed by Paul Feig and starring Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon and Leslie Jones, comes to India this week. The film does more than sport with the increasingly tiresome subject of identity politics and pop culture, says The Guardian. It delivers a really funny and spectacular action comedy that pays tribute to the first film with in-jokes, twists and cameos, and yet produces a brand new work, as smart as paint.

A.V. Club is not nearly as impressed, saying this might be the most visually engaging film Feig has made, but he’s not enough of a comic anarchist to let his actor-friendly, improv-heavy sensibility run wild in the world of crazy special effects. As enjoyable as this movie is, sometimes it feels like it’s holding back; no one’s id runs wild.

Steven Spielberg’s fantasy adventure The BFG, starring Mark Rylance, Ruby Barnhill and Penelope Wilton, is a small, friendly movie, an attempt to reconcile the scale and dazzle of modern filmmaking with the quiet, mischievous charm of Roald Dahl’s book, says The New York Times. Spielberg tries to replicate the delicate mood of Dahl’s work, and compared with other recent entertainment of its kind, including some of his own films, The BFG is notably restrained.

TIME magazine adds that this ambitious blend of live action and computer animation runs the risk of being overwhelming and sterile, but it turns out to be a pleasing and sweet-natured adventure, thanks in large part to Spielberg’s big, friendly secret weapon: Mark Rylance, as the BFG himself. For such a big, extravagant movie, with such an outsized central character, The BFG is surprisingly intimate, and that’s largely thanks to Rylance.

Director duo Jon Lucas and Scott Moore’s comedy, Bad Moms, starring Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell, Kathryn Hahn and Annie Mumolo, amusing as it is, never resolves its tension between real truths and movie-land problem-solving where the good guys win because they’re good, no matter how “bad" they pretend to be, says A.V Club. The process of making a relatable comedy while simultaneously engaging in another bad-off puts some strain on the writer-directors who alternate some innocuously lame sight gags.

amnewyork.com is more impressed, calling the comedy wild and fun. The writer-director duo brings a comedy style similar to Mean Girls with vicious, raunchy humour and lots of raucous behaviour.

Marathi film Lost and Found, directed by Ruturaj Dhalgade and starring Siddharth Chandekar and Spruha Joshi, has a reasonably good central premise, but that’s about it, says Pune Mirror. The screenplay feels like a first draft with most things yet to be detailed out, and that reflects in the final product. The film doesn’t discuss the social issues connected with the theme adequately, and doesn’t make us care for the characters enough.

Several releases this week haven’t inspired any reviews yet. These include director Dipu Karunakaran’s Hindi film Mission Tiger, starring Vijay Raaz; Malayalam film White, directed by Uday Ananthan and starring Mammootty and Huma Qureshi; Kannada biopic drama Santheyalli Nintha Kabira; and Punjabi film Carry On Jatta 2, starring Gippy Grewal and Gurpreet Ghuggi and directed by Smeep Kang.

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