New Delhi: There is much to choose from at the movies this week.

Juhi Chawla and Shabana Azmi-starrer Chalk N Duster directed by Jayant Gilatar is a well-intended film on the education system but the execution is so botched that it ends up as silly and stupid, says NDTV. Anyone with any love for their teachers should give this one a miss, it says.

Hindustan Times is more impressed, calling it a film worth your time thanks to sincere performances and meaningful storytelling. The director, however, doesn’t ever offer an alternative to the current business-like model of education.

Rebellious Flower, director Krishan Hooda’s film on the life of godman Osho Rajneesh starring Prince Shah, Shashank Singh and Mantra, is marred by loose editing, clichéd dialogues and terrible post-production work, according to bollywood.about.com.

Slugging it out in the awards season abroad, Tom Hooper’s pseudo-biographical drama The Danish Girl on Lili Elbe—one of the first people to undergo sex reassignment surgery—also comes to India this week. The Telegraph says that the film, starring Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander, is revolutionary. A beautiful, humane and moving bio-pic marked by tasteful storytelling and a dazzlingly controlled performance by Redmayne.

Variety magazine calls the film a cinematic landmark, lauding its sensitive depiction of highly controversial issues. Redmayne gives the greatest performance of his career, ahead even of his stunning Oscar-winning turn as Stephen Hawking in last year’s The Theory of Everything.

Antonio Banderas’ English-language Chilean survival drama The 33 directed by Patricia Riggen is a formulaic take on the collapse of a century-old mine and the miners’ ordeal, says The Hollywood Reporter. The unremarkable screenplay gets in the way of a powerful real-life story and it’s a pity Riggen takes no risks to uplift the film, is the verdict.

Variety magazine agrees that the film doesn’t dig deep enough. It feels like a sober docu-drama suffering from wafer-thin characterizations and a conspicuously non-Chilean ensemble.

Quentin Tarantino’s mystery film The Hateful Eight featuring Samuel L. Jackson and Kurt Russell straddles various political, geographical, social, sexual and racial implications together and doesn’t play safe for even a moment, says Rolling Stone. There is loads of gore and misogyny but the film will nag at your conscience and not let it go.

The Sydney Morning Herald adds that the film is everything you expect from Tarantino: political incorrectness, roaring revenge and self-parody. Like always, you’re unsure of where you stand at the end and yet there are deep layers and meanings.

Marathi film Shasan starring Makarand Anaspure, Bharat Jadhav and Jitendra Joshi, directed by Gajendra Ahire ,is an interesting idea reduced considerably in merit by a half-hearted presentation, says Pune Mirror. The film overflows with actors, many of whom are wasted.

In the south, Telugu action family drama Nannaku Prematho directed by Sukumar, starring NTR Jr. and Rakul Preet Singh, is a routine but intelligent family revenge drama, says Telugumirchi.com. The performances are powerful and the actioner avoids unnecessary violence to emerge as an engaging watch.

Nandamuri Balakrishna-starrer Dictator, directed by Sriwass, is a formulaic mass entertainer that should be a treat for his fans, says Chitramala. The actor shines and carries the film on his shoulders, but the basic screenplay and treatment have nothing new to offer.

Kathakali, a Tamil action-thriller directed by Pandiraj, starring Vishal and Catherine Tresa is a pretty neat attempt, says Tamil Glitz. The plot keeps you on the edge of your seat with its unpredictable twists and the film is stylishly shot and edited.

Tamil comedy drama Rajini Murugan ,starring Sivakarthikeyan and Keerthy Suresh directed by Ponram, will prove a fairly entertaining family drama as long as you’re willing to leave your brains behind, says behindwoods.com. Sivakarthikeyan delivers greatly as a performer but the screenplay could’ve been way tighter for the film to not have just ended up as an ordinary comedy.

Tamil musical drama Tharai Thappattai, featuring Sasikumar and Varalaxmi Sarathkumar and directed by Bala, tells the story of Karakattam musicians and dancers in Tanjavur and touches deep chords with its realistic storytelling, says Film Dhamaka. The raw visuals, convincing performances and amazing music add to the beauty of this film.

Some releases this week haven’t inspired any reviews yet. These include Gujarati romantic comedy Romance Complicated, Malayalam film Monsoon Mangoes, Telugu fantasy film Soggade Chinni Nayana, starring Nagarjuna and Ramya Krishnan, and Kannada political thriller Devara Naadalli.

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