Rajinikanth and Akshay Kumar’s film 2.0 that had been enjoying an uninterrupted run in theatres so far finally has some competition
Rajinikanth and Akshay Kumar’s film 2.0 that had been enjoying an uninterrupted run in theatres so far finally has some competition

‘Kedarnath,’ ‘Mortal Engines’ will take on ‘2.0’ in second week

Sushant Singh Rajput and Sara Ali Khan-starrer Kedarnath directed by Abhishek Kapoor starts off with promise by using the 2013 Uttarakhand floods as a major plot twist. The Bollywood film released today and will compete with the trilingual blockbuster 2.0.

New Delhi: Rajinikanth’s science fiction film 2.0 that had been enjoying an uninterrupted run in theatres so far finally has some competition.

Sushant Singh Rajput and Sara Ali Khan-starrer Kedarnath directed by Abhishek Kapoor starts off with promise, says The Indian Express. Using the devastating 2013 Uttarakhand floods as a major plot twist should have given the film some real-life gravitas. But the writing is sketchy, and the tone confused, never quite knowing whether to go quiet and life-like or to swell with wailing violins, especially when the waters start rising, and life-threatening danger starts looming.

What we have in Kedarnath is an irresistible visual treat, says NDTV. On other parameters, too, the film strings together elements that seem promising at first flush. But the positive features are eventually buried under a deluge of clichés aggravated by a contrived climax.

For the Hollywood fans, post-apocalyptic adventure film Mortal Engines directed by Christian Rivers starring Hugo Weaving, Hera Hilmar and Robert Sheehan comes to India this week. The movie devolves from promising to unwieldy, then baffling, then exhausting, then finally unintentionally hysterical, says Variety magazine. Here making his directorial debut, Rivers spent years as a storyboard artist and a visual effects supervisor for Peter Jackson (who produced this film and wrote the screenplay alongside Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens), and he’s inherited a good deal of his longtime collaborator’s love for mythic world-building and hyperreal CGI spectacle. He’s gleaned little of Jackson’s facility with actors or characterization, however, and Mortal Engines starts to sputter as soon as we’re introduced to our dramatis personae.

Jackson has turned Philip Reeve’s dystopian adventure novel into a tiringly frenetic and derivative fantasy-adventure movie, says The Guardian. The film is basically a steampunk Star Wars, with a bit of low-octane Gilliam and Gaiman on the side. By the end, in fact, the resemblances to George Lucas’s great creation become so distractingly obvious that it is difficult to credit that it isn’t some kind of intentional homage.

There is also supernatural horror film The Possession of Hannah Grace directed by Diederik Van Rooijen starring Shay Mitchell, Kirby Johnson and Stana Katic. Rooijen’s overreliance on herky-jerky jump scares is a pity, because the movie that exists in the silence is surprisingly satisfying, says The New York Times. Jump scares might generate a momentary response, but the only fear that lingers from The Possession of Hannah Grace is the suggestion that the devil inspires less terror than the doctor.

It probably won’t take long for word to trickle out that The Possession of Hannah Grace, after the first five minutes, is not an exorcism movie, says Variety magazine. Rather, it’s about the corpse of a girl who dies during an exorcism, so technically speaking you could say that it qualifies. But viewers hooked on the spectacle of demonic possession tend to like their satanic tropes served neat. The Possession of Hannah Grace serves them sloppy, if not without a certain random soupçon of grisly style.

Tamil sports drama Dhoni Kabadi Kuzhu starring Leema Babu directed by P.Iyyappan is an amateurish exercise that struggles to keep us hooked, despite its honourable intention of glorifying the sport of kabaddi, mainly due to the performances that are bland, and the flat filmmaking, says The Times Of India.

Telugu romantic film Subrahmanyapuram starring Sumanth and Eesha Rebba directed by Santhosh Jagarlapudi is one of those films where the excitement on paper fails to translate to the big screen, says mirchi9.com. There are parts that are high on suspense but as a whole, the film is below par. The all-important climax also falls flat after all the build-up.

Bengali drama Reunion starring Parambrata Chatterjee and Raima Sen directed by Murari M Rakshit is an interesting mix of youthful nostalgia and violent campus politics, says Film Companion. It is by all means a more than competent effort which largely pays off.

Telugu romantic comedy Next Enti and Bengali drama Ami Sudhu Tor Holam haven’t inspired any reviews yet.

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