2.0 movie talks at length about the sad reality of the sparrows vanishing from our metropolises but the pressing nature of the debate is buried deep under a flashy, impressive demo of animatronics, special effects and prosthetics.
2.0 movie talks at length about the sad reality of the sparrows vanishing from our metropolises but the pressing nature of the debate is buried deep under a flashy, impressive demo of animatronics, special effects and prosthetics.

Rajinikanth’s 2.0 dominates the week at box office

What is really frustrating about Rajinikanth's movie 2.0 is that it constantly tries to create an impression that it knows enough and, by that extension, cares.

New Delhi: It’s superstar Rajinikanth’s turn at the movies this week. Not surprisingly, few other films have dared to compete. His much delayed highly anticipated science fiction film 2.0 co-starring Akshay Kumar directed by Shankar Shanmugam looks and sounds great for the most part, says NDTV.

It whizzes by thanks to the breathless action and the dazzling VFX. 2.0, however, would have been a far greater film had the screenplay dared to go beyond the known tricks of the genre. Because the storytelling is, well, robotic, the frenetic action sequences rarely touch the heights that the flying mobiles achieve. The film talks at length about the sad reality of the sparrows vanishing from our metropolises but the pressing nature of the debate is buried deep under a flashy, impressive demo of animatronics, special effects and prosthetics.

The film fails on the science but stuns on the imagery, says The Wire. What is really frustrating about 2.0 is that it constantly tries to create an impression that it knows enough and, by that extension, cares. It does so by using keywords – the film is filled with references to “photon synthesiser", “electromagnetic radiation", “micro photon" – which feel hollow because, beyond word-dropping, there’s scarce evidence of any scientific engagement in this movie.

For the Hollywood fans, American sports drama Creed II directed by Steven Caple Jr., starring Michael B. Jordan, Sylvester Stallone and Tessa Thompson comes to India this week. Creed II is to Creed what the Rocky sequels are to the original: a more generic, less textured take on familiar boxing movie tropes, says Empire magazine. The difference, it seems, is Creed director Ryan Coogler. After the first film, it feels like a regressive step. First time round Coogler’s footwork was fast, his power both pinpoint-accurate and devastating. Creed II only connects occasionally.

Taken on its own terms, the movie is a rousing and effective sequel, with a couple of surprise punches and, mostly, a lot of smooth feints and jabs you’ve seen before. But if you compare it to, say, the second and third Rocky sequels, with their larger-than-life villains, what’s noticeable about Creed II is that it never quite comes up with a new character or situation that attains an iconic status all its own.

The non-Hindi local releases of the week haven’t inspired any reviews yet. These include Kannada action comedy Gaanchali and Punjabi films Din Dehade Lai Jaange and Chan Tara.

Close