It was about time. Need for Speed: No Limits, is the first original Need for Speed game built from scratch for Android and iOS devices. Published by EA Sports, it is developed by Firemonkeys, the Australian developers responsible for the very popular Real Racing game series but the games have very little in common.

Need for Speed is a rather fun arcade game, unlike the simulation that Real Racing was all about. But, just like the latter, Need for Speed will also keep getting more cars, events and more along the way—something Firemonkeys had done very well with Real Racing.

This game is is free to download but as a freemium game, there are optional in-app purchases that will make progress quicker for you.

What this is about

It is quite apparent that Need for Speed isn’t short on excitement, and racing fans will love it. There are 900 race events, players can climb 100 levels as they progress through the stages, 38 race tracks in different cities and 30 fully licensed cars. There is a lot of focus on upgrading the cars for more power and performance: A lot of accessories to splurge on as you carry on playing the game.

Gameplay

Since this is an arcade game, you do move away a bit from the sort of everything to scale realism of simulation games. You are basically fighting with the law—the “underground", as they say with cars jumping off bridges, evading the cops, smashing through roadblocks and you get points for pummelling into some innocent road user probably going home after a hard day at work. The game is a bit on the evil side, but then again, racing games are never meant to be inspirations for the real world. And while you can upgrade your street racers with newer parts, there is no tinkering with camber rations and fuel mixtures that you would expect to see if the gameplay was based on a racetrack. Simply earn enough in-game points, buy a new part and away you go, slightly faster than before hopefully.

The gameplay controls are pretty straightforward—you tap on the left of the screen to steer left, tap on the right to steer right, swipe up to get the nitro speed boost for a few seconds and swipe down to drift the car around a corner. Casual gamers would really appreciate the fact that somewhat complex details such as acceleration and braking around bends are managed automatically by the artificial intelligence within the game. We noticed that there are some easy races where you are able to get ahead of the rivals much more easily than other times. But, while you do get points for close shaves with other cars on the road, for example, not winning pretty much means you aren’t earning any more money. Second is the first of the losers, in a nutshell.

The graphics are a bit of a mixed bag. The menu layout, though clean, looks a bit dated. However, the landscape around you on the racetrack is very well detailed.

Download or not?

The way EA have integrated the entire “freemium" method is that the pay-to-progress option is well and truly separated from the pure racing action. Yes, you have the option of buying progress, because the more honest route can be a bit time consuming and often repetitive after a while. Plus, there are some really exotic cars waiting to be unlocked, and it is the anticipation of getting them into your garage which will perhaps make you think about splashing the in-game cash. For the casual gamers, this is a good title to have on your phone. The more avid racing game fans will perhaps be more interested to know what the next big updates are—and so are we.

Close