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Home / Industry / Infotech /  2mpower Health Management Services | The serious business of health

Enterprise name: 2mpower Health Management Services Pvt. Ltd

Entrepreneurs: Mohammed Hussain Naseem (50) and Murtaza Beawerwala (53)

Founded: September 2011

Location: Bengaluru

Brand name: GetActive

GetActive was started by two fitness enthusiasts who were determined to make people take their health seriously. “On returning to India in 1998, after spending four years at GE Medical Systems, I realized that people tend to ignore their health after joining a corporate job. This made me think of doing something that could make people take their health more seriously," said Mohammed Hussain Naseem, a self-confessed fitness freak who at 50 still participates in long-distance running. Naseem, an IIT Bombay mechanical engineering graduate, spent 20 years working across various roles in companies such as GE, Wipro, Infosys and IBM before finally deciding to set up a fitness-based start-up after working on a whitepaper on how technology would play a disruptive role in healthcare, as part of his role as head of the healthcare vertical at IBM in 2005.

2mpower Health Management Services was started in 2009 by Naseem and his longtime family friend, Murtaza Beawerwala, owner of a family-run retail business who was keen to aid Naseem in doing something to spread health awareness after seeing the positive changes in his own family’s lifestyle, based on Naseem’s advice.

“The first two years of 2mpower was as a wellness centre in Bangalore where a team of doctors, physiotherapists, and nutritionists went to corporates to get employees enrolled in a typical fitness programme with a personal health coach. While we earned 2,500 clients with this initiative, with an 80% dropout rate from the programme, we learnt that people are willing to take initiatives towards better health, but hate a third person regulating their lifestyle," said Naseem. The solution to this problem came in the form of GetActive, which came out with three smart health monitoring devices. These could be connected to a smartphone app through a buddy programme for users to train and compete with each other. Users get rewarded with virtual currency for meeting or exceeding their pre-programmed fitness goals from the app, which could be redeemed for real gifts at retail stores or a free health check-up.

The three products include a wristband called GetActive Tapp, priced at 4,999. The band tracks steps taken by the user, body mass index, provides personalized health updates using data analytics connected through Bluetooth to a smartphone.

The other two products currently available include GetActive Slim, a device priced at 2999, that has a built-in sleep monitor and a fitness tracker and GetActive eZ, which sells at 1,999 and is a fitness tracker with a large LCD display. GetActive received funding from ex-Infosys executives T. Mohandas Pai, and Sharad Hegde—the two had previously worked with Naseem at Infosys; as well as from Kiran Anandampillai, co-founder of OnMobile, a mobile services company, and P. Rangarajan, co-founder of Appnomic, an IT infrastructure management services firm.

GetActive, which started selling its products in 2012, claims to have a customer base of 20,000 in India across the corporate and retail sector in the age group of 30-40 years. Products are sold via the official website, as well as through more than 100 partners in India across e-commerce sites such as Flipkart.com and also through offline retailers such as Croma, SPORTXS and Religare Wellness. GetActive is hoping to go global by the second half of 2015 in neighbouring countries in South-east Asia, Australia, New Zealand and the Middle East. GetActive is also looking at starting a marketplace for health specialists to provide expert assistance to users, and also offer them a customized health package that they can choose. The company also plans to expand its current offerings and has filed for three provisional patents last year. To take their plans forward, GetActive is looking to raise $3-5 million via institutional funding from venture capitalists.

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