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Photo: Hemant Mishra/Mint (Hemant Mishra/Mint)
Photo: Hemant Mishra/Mint
(Hemant Mishra/Mint)

Tech tidbits: Twitter’s transformation, big data, and greener lighting

Twitter may look like TV or radio, and how big data will become just data

Twitter’s transformation

Microblogging site Twitter may eventually resemble a broadcast medium like television or radio, with users reading messages written by celebrities and corporations rather than writing their own tweets of up to 140 characters, suggests a 29 May study co-authored by Andrew T. Stephen, assistant professor of business administration and Katz Fellow in Marketing in the University of Pittsburgh’s Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business and College of Business Administration.

Big data will become just data

Big data will grow past its hype towards 2016 to become just data once the technologies mature and organizations learn how to deal with it, according to a 5 June Gartner Inc. report. While data is regularly defined by the dimensions of volume, velocity and variety (first proposed by Gartner more than 12 years ago), information management concerns must be much broader. “The bottom line is that not all information requires a big data approach," said Frank Buytendijk, research vice-president at Gartner. “The new big data way is not going to replace all other forms of information management. There is more room—and need—for experimentation in the area of information of innovation, for instance, with social media data, or by making processes more information-centric."

Organic, greener lighting

Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) hold the promise of being both environmentally friendly and versatile for home-lighting appliances. Though not as efficient as regular LEDs, they offer a wider range of material choices and are more energy efficient than traditional lights. To make OLEDs more cheaply and easily, researchers from the University of Louisville in Kentucky are developing new materials and production methods using modified quantum dots and inkjet printing, according to a 4 June media release.

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