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Aspirin helps prevent platelets from accumulating and forming clots which can block arteries and lead to heart attacks and strokes. Photo: iStockphoto
Aspirin helps prevent platelets from accumulating and forming clots which can block arteries and lead to heart attacks and strokes. Photo: iStockphoto

Daily dose of 81mg aspirin can lower heart attack risk

Children born to older women are more likely to be healthier and more educated and people with diabetes face greater risk of liver diseasestudies and research tips for a healthier you

Chemical found in fast food linked to asthma and cancer

People who eat more fast food are likely to have higher levels of a potentially harmful chemical called phthalates, a US study warns. Researchers from George Washington University examined data on 8,877 individuals who provide detailed information about their diet and found that phthalate levels were 40% higher in people who ate fast food frequently. Phthalates is used in food packaging, tubing for dairy products, and other items used in the production of fast food. It has been associated with a number of serious health problems like asthma and cancer. The study was published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. Read more here.

Aspirin can cut heart attack risk in adults

Taking 81mg aspirin daily can lower the risk of heart attack and stroke in 50-year-old adults with no prior history of cardiovascular diseases, a US government backed independent study claims. Aspirin helps prevent platelets from accumulating and forming clots which can block arteries and lead to heart attacks and strokes. The drug can lead to bleeding as the body also relies on platelet clusters to seal wounds by forming scabs. Researchers pointed out that the medication may not apply on people above 60 years as the risk of bleeding increases with age. Read more here.

Vegetable oil can lower cholesterol but not the risk of heart diseases

Cooking in vegetable oil as an alternative to saturated fats can help control cholesterol, but it may not lower the risk of heart disease, a US study suggests. People believe that polyunsaturated fat found in vegetable oil, nuts and seeds are good for heart. Researchers from the University of North Carolina examined data gathered for an earlier study involving 9,400 people. It was found that for every 30 mg/dL reduction in cholesterol, the risk of death due to cardiovascular diseases increased by 22%. The study was published in the British Medical Journal. Read more here.

Children born to older mothers are likely to be fitter

Children born to older mothers are more likely to be healthier, taller and more educated than children born to younger mothers, a British study claims. Childbearing at older ages increases the risk of negative pregnancy outcomes such as down syndrome. It also increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, hypertension and diabetes in the child in later life. Researchers from the London School of Economics found that delaying childbearing means the child will be born at a later year. For example, a 10-year difference in maternal age means the children will be born in better social and environmental conditions. The study was published in the Population and Development Review. Read more here.

Risk of liver disease higher in diabetics

People with type-2 diabetes are at greater risk of serious liver disease than those without the condition, a British study suggests. Researchers from the University of Edinburgh and the University of Southampton examined hospital records and death records in Scotland for 10 years and found that most of the liver disease cases found in people with type-2 diabetes and they were not caused by alcohol consumption but due to accumulation of fat in liver cells. They also found that men with type-2 diabetes were three times more likely to suffer from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease compared to men without diabetes. Though the cases were fewer in women, the risk of liver disease was five times than women diagnosed with diabetes. The study appeared in the Journal of Hepatology. Read more here.

Compiled by Abhijit Ahaskar

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