In 2012, fashion went from the clothes rack to the book rack; from ramp to museum. January’s Jaipur Literature Festival saw designer Wendell Rodricks launch Moda Goa: History and Style, a history of Goan costumes that took him 11 years to write. The first such book after Ritu Kumar’s 1999 tome Costumes and Textiles of Royal India, Rodricks’ work re-instilled our hope in Indian designers as chroniclers.

The very next month, an Abraham & Thakore sari was chosen to be part of the permanent collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. A piece of vernacular dressing in charcoal silk with an inlaid cycle rickshaw, worn high and short with an appliqué tunic tucked into the waist, a slim leather belt and mojri wedges, it was from the first collection designer duo David Abraham and Rakesh Thakore showed in India (Autumn-Winter 2010) after 18 years in the industry. Symbolic both of retro-modernism that dominates our fashion movement and the world’s deepening curiosity in Indian design, the sari is our inheritance of gain.

Uggie stole the thunder at the Oscars with his 18-carat bone bow tie, custom-made by Swiss luxury brand Chopard. Photo: Steve Granitz/WrieImage/Getty Images
Uggie stole the thunder at the Oscars with his 18-carat bone bow tie, custom-made by Swiss luxury brand Chopard. Photo: Steve Granitz/WrieImage/Getty Images
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