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Exposure to second-hand smoke can affect cognitive development and lead to obesity in children. Photo: iStock
Exposure to second-hand smoke can affect cognitive development and lead to obesity in children. Photo: iStock

Second hand smoke can affect your child’s intelligence

Chemical used to add flavour to e-cigarettes can irritate lungs and exposure to pain in tendon can be an indicator of diabetesstudies and research tips for a healthier you

Obesity during pregnancy can lead to autism

Risk of autism is two times higher in children born to mothers who were obese during pregnancy, warns a US study. The risk increases four times if the women also had diabetes at the time of pregnancy. To explore the link between autism and the two conditions, researchers from Johns Hopkins University examined data gathered on 2,734 mother-child pairs from 1998 to 2014. It was found that mothers of autistic children were more likely to be obese and have diabetes before or during pregnancy. The study doesn’t specify the exact reason, but some experts believe it can be due to increased inflammation and high exposure to nutrients. The study was published in the journal Pediatrics.

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Second hand smoke can make children obese and affect intelligence

Exposure to second-hand smoke can affect cognitive development and lead to obesity in children, a study suggests. Researchers from Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University examined the effect of passive smoke on 220 overweight or obese children in the age group of 7 to 11. They found that the percentage of body fat in children exposed to smoke was considerably higher compared to children who were not exposed to smoke. Children who were exposed to smoke also scored poorly in cognitive tests. The study was published in the journal Childhood Obesity.

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Chemical in e-cigarretes can cause irritation in lungs

People using flavoured e-cigarettes, particularly ones that taste like cherry, are likely inhaling a chemical that can irritate their airways, a new study suggests. Researchers measured the benzaldehyde contained in 30 puffs taken from 145 different e-cigarette liquids using an automatic smoke inhaler. They found benzaldehyde in the vapours of 108 of the 145 flavoured cigarettes tested for the study. The highest concentration of the chemical was found in cherry-flavoured cigarettes. Benzaldehyde is an aromatic aldehyde used in food stuff and cosmetics. Though it is not considered a serious threat to humans, but when inhaled it can irritate the airways. The study was published in the journal Thorax.

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Spouse continues to affect well-being of partner even after death

Dead partner’s characteristics continue to affect the quality of life of the surviving partner, study claims. Researchers from the University of Arizona decided to use data from an ongoing research involving 80,000 ageing adults from 18 countries. They zeroed in on data for 546 couples who had lost a partner and for 2,566 couples in which both partners were still living. They found that the association between the partners remained even after the death of one partner. They found no observable difference in the widowed partner’s quality of life before and after the death of the partner when compared with spouses whose partners were still alive. The study was published in the journal Psychological Science.

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Tendon pain can be a sign of diabetes

People with type-2 diabetes are three times more likely to suffer form tendinopathy than healthy people, and its occurrence in healthy people can be an indicator of diabetes, an Australian study suggests. Tendinopathy is a condition in which tendons inflame due to overuse or repetitive movements, resulting in pain that can impair movement. Researchers from the University of Canberra examined 26 studies that covered people with type-2 diabetes and five studies that focused on people with tendinopathy. When they combined the two, it was found that people with type-2 diabetes were 3.67 times more likely to develop tendinopathy and people with tendinopathy were 1.3 times more likely to develop diabetes. The study appeared in the British Journal of Sports Medicine

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Compiled by Abhijit Ahaskar

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