Designs from Moschino [tv] H&M capsule.
Designs from Moschino [tv] H&M capsule.

Moschino and H&M collaborate on a capsule collection

The creative director of Moschino on his brand new collaboration with H&M, pop culture inspirations and the importance of humour and subversion in fashion

Collaborative collections between fashion designers and clothing brands are commonplace now, making high fashion more accessible while raising the aspiration value of the brands in the equation. The annual H&M designer collaboration which began in 2004 is one of the most anticipated offerings by the brand. The brand’s collaborators have included names like Karl Lagerfeld, Versace, Balmain and Alexander Wang. This year, as Moschino joins the league of collaboration with a buzzy, kitschy collaborative collection, the brand’s creative director, Jeremy Scott, speaks to Lounge about his inspirations—drawing from pop culture, designing for pets and what it means to be fashionable today. Edited excerpts from an email interview.

How does the collaboration draw from your aesthetics?

This collaboration is 100% Moschino, 100% me. I wanted it to be more than just a collaboration. I wanted it to be like a Moschino capsule, an extra collection for the season, this special moment that’s totally democratic and affordable for the people. It’s the true DNA of Moschino, with the sense of humour, the pop culture, the mix of high and low and the feeling of the street.

Which are the pieces that really define the collaboration?

I wanted to make a collection where every single piece mattered—everything counts, whether it’s a statement piece like the faux fur coat that’s punctured with gold chains or one of the organic cotton T-shirts. Every piece has the attitude and energy, the fun and sense of humour that defines Moschino [tv] H&M.

What inspired the pop culture motifs that populate the collection?

What I love about using pop culture in fashion is how it communicates beyond language. In my work I can use logos or icons like Mickey and the whole Disney gang, and immediately people know what I mean. I can speak to people in Taiwan or Timbuktu at the same time, and they know exactly what I mean. I love to take iconography and change it, subvert it, play with it, and then send it out into the world.

And you’ve also designed for pets.

I had so much fun! H&M asked me to design some pieces for kids. I already do kidswear for Moschino and my own label, so I thought let’s try something new! It was so much fun and the collar with the gold Moschino letters is so iconic. It’s like it makes me want to get a dog myself!

Why is fun and subversion so important for fashion?

For me fashion is about joy and pleasure, and expressing who you really are. I also believe that having fun can be a political act. Being positive and inclusive is about sharing love and optimism, and also (having) the right on this planet to express yourself and to be who you want to be. And I hope to open some hearts and minds along the way.

What does it mean to be fashionable in 2018?

The same as it means every year—be your true self, have fun, push your look, don’t be afraid, be an individual, follow your own rules, and most of all, have fun.

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Fashion for everyone

Ann-Sofie Johansson, creative adviser of H&M, on the thrill of collaborations

On the Moschino collaboration

We are so excited to be collaborating with Moschino—they’ve been on our radar for some time, and there’s something about (the brand) that feels so right for now.

Designing the capsule

Jeremy knew straight away that he wanted Moschino [tv] H&M to be like a capsule collection, bringing together some favourite pieces with new elements, and also collaborations within the collaboration with Disney and MTV. He wanted it to be this mix of street with glamour, with a real sense of humour, and so many different options for his fans and our customers to buy.

Fashion makes a statement

Fashion should be for everyone, no matter who you are or where you come from. This is one of Jeremy’s beliefs too, and it’s been amazing to think about this as a democratic collection.

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