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Increasing the daily intake of water by 1% can help in burning calories and reducing the intake of sugar, sodium and cholesterol. Photo: iStockphoto
Increasing the daily intake of water by 1% can help in burning calories and reducing the intake of sugar, sodium and cholesterol. Photo: iStockphoto

An extra glass of water can burn calories

Chronic stress can weaken immune system and working under a superior who is always unfair is less stressful than working under an unpredictable superiorstudies and research tips for a healthier you

Drinking a glass of water can burn over 200 calories every day

Increasing the daily intake of water by 1% can help in burning calories and reducing the intake of sugar, sodium and cholesterol, a US study suggests. Researchers from the University of Illinois examined the dietary habits of more than 18,300 men and women and found drinking two or three more cups of water daily cut energy intake by 68 to 205 calories, sodium intake by 78 to 235g, sugar intake by 5 to 18g and cholesterol consumption by 7 to 21%. The study was published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Read more here.

Workers feel happy working under a constantly unfair boss

People working under a boss who is consistently unfair feel less stressed and more satisfied with their job than people working under a boss who is unpredictable, a US study suggests. Researchers from Michigan State University conducted a field study involving workers and their superiors working in 95 different workplaces. The workers and their bosses were studied daily for three weeks. Employees with unpredictable superiors were found to be more stressed, emotionally exhausted and dissatisfied with their job compared to workers who were treated poorly all the time. The study was published in the Academy of Management Journal. Read more here.

Acute stress can affect immune system

Acute psychosocial and emotional stress can exhaust the immune system and make it less effective against pathogens and diseases, a study warns. Researchers at the University of California enlisted 39 men and women with no history of cardiac or mental illness. The participants were enrolled in a sky diving course and asked to jump out of a plane to induce acute stress. Their blood and saliva samples were taken before and after they jumped. Researchers found that acute stress affects transcriptome of white blood cells permanently compared to ordinary stress where transcriptome is restored in an hour. The study was published in Brain, Behavior and Immunity. Read more here.

Living with a partner can avert early death in cancer patients

The risk of cancer death is greater in people who live alone compared to those who are living with a partner, an Australian study claims. Researchers from Queensland University of Technology studied 176,000 cancer cases diagnosed between 1996 and 2012. It was found that the risk of early death was 26% higher if the patient was a single man and 20% higher if the patient was a single woman. The odds of survival also depended on the type of cancer. The research was published in the International Journal of Cancer Epidemiology. Read more here.

Timely psychiatric help can avert suicide re-attempts

Providing timely psychiatric treatment to people trying to take their own life can cut the risk of another suicide attempt, a Swiss study suggests. Doctors from University Hospital of Psychiatry in Bern conducted a clinical trial on 120 people who had been admitted for attempted suicide in the emergency department of the Bern University General Hospital. Half of the participants were assigned to three therapy sessions. After 24 months of follow up, the risk of another suicide attempt was found to be 80% lower in the group that received therapy. Also, the participants spent 72% less time in the hospital after the therapy. The study was published in PLOS Medicine. Read more here.

Compiled by Abhijit Ahaskar

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