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Young adults who can’t handle stress and take up a hostile attitude towards others are more likely to face memory and thinking-related problems in later life. Photo: iStockphoto
Young adults who can’t handle stress and take up a hostile attitude towards others are more likely to face memory and thinking-related problems in later life. Photo: iStockphoto

Short tempered? Your memory may fail you

Certain asthma symptoms can cause stress and anxiety in adolescents and daily intake of coffee can cut the risk of multiple sclerosisstudies and research tips for a healthier you

Asthma symptoms can lead to stress and anxiety in teens

Asthma symptoms like waking up in the middle of the night and shortness of breath can increase stress and anxiety in adolescents, a US study shows. Researchers at Henry Ford Hospital studied 38 asthma patients in the age group of 14 to 17 years and interviewed them about their sleeping habits and feelings of anxiety. They found that those who suffered higher levels of sleep disruption reported highest levels of stress and anxiety compared to the general population. The study was presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology’s annual meeting. Read more here.

People who can’t handle stress and lose temper face memory issues later

Young adults who can’t handle stress and take up a hostile attitude towards others are more likely to face memory and thinking-related problems in later life, a US study suggests. Researchers backed by multiple US universities enlisted 3,126 people for the study and asked them questions to assess their attitude, ability to handle stress, and memory and thinking capability when they were 25 and again when they turned 50. It was found that people who suffered from both the traits performed poorly in tests on thinking and memory after 25 years. The study was published in the journal Neurology. Read more here.

Drinking coffee can cut multiple sclerosis risk

Drinking six cups of coffee daily can cut the risk of multiple sclerosis by 5-30%, a new study claims. Though caffeine is known as a stimulant, it has neuroprotective properties which can suppress the chemicals which can trigger multiple sclerosis, researchers believe. Two different studies involving over 5,000 people with multiple sclerosis and without it were examined. Participants were asked about their coffee consumption. The findings suggest that risk of the disease is higher among those drinking fewer cups of coffee every day in both studies. The study appeared in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. Read more here.

Male friendship helps in stress

Having male friends can help people handle stress better, a University of California study suggests. Though the study was based on male rats, the researchers feel it can be applicable to humans too. In an experiment where male rats were kept in a single cage, it was found that mild stress made male rats more social and cooperative than they are in an unstressed environment. “Having friends is not un-masculine. These rats are using their rat friendships to recover from what would otherwise be a negative experience. If rats can do it, men can do it too. And they definitely are, they just don’t get as much credit in the research for that," said co-author Elizabeth Kirby. The study was published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology. Read more here.

Peanut butter can reduce obesity risk in teens

Including peanut products or peanut butter in daily diet can reduce body mass Index (BMI) and risk of obesity in adolescents, a US study shows. Researchers at the University of Houston enlisted 257 adolescents from three schools in Houston for 12 weeks. The study was published in the Journal of Applied Research on Children. Half the students received a snack of peanuts or peanut butter three to four times a week, while the rest received the snack fewer than once a week. Those students who received the snack more regularly experienced a significant decrease in their overall BMI compared to those who did not receive the regular peanut snack. Read more here.

Compiled by Abhijit Ahaskar

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