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People using social media networks are more likely to be flexible and tolerant towards other religious beliefs and practices. Photo: iStock
People using social media networks are more likely to be flexible and tolerant towards other religious beliefs and practices. Photo: iStock

Use of social media can make you more tolerant

Exercising at any age is good for brain and silent heart attacks can be more fatal as they are often hard to detectstudies and research tips for a healthier you

Mental health and sensory factors as critical as physical health

Loneliness and sensory factors like hearing loss are as important to someone’s well-being and risk of death as traditional factors such as cancer and high blood pressure, a US study suggests. Reseachers from University of Chicago compared a traditional medical model (based on physical health and the absence of disease) with a comprehensive model (which includes medical, physical, psychological, functional and sensory factors). The researchers used data from a national level study involving people in the age group of 57 to 85. The findings revealed that about 66% of the population is healthy as per the medical model, but according to the comprehensive model, 50% that population has health problems that increases their risk of death or incapacitation over the next five years. The study was published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Use of social networks can make people more flexible in their religious thoughts

People using social media networks are more likely to be flexible and tolerant towards other religious beliefs and practices, a US study suggests. Researchers from Baylor University examined three surveys based on telephone conversation between youth in the age group of 13 to 29 and their parents between 2002 and 2013. The findings of the study showed that youngsters who spent more time on social networks were 50 to 80% more likely to be more flexible in their outlook towards religion and were more tolerant towards others who are from their faith but wish to practice other religions. The study was published in the journal Sociological Perspectives.

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Silent heart attacks can be fatal

Nearly half of all heart attacks are silent and occur without the usual symptoms such as pain in chest, shortness of breath and cold sweats, a new study claims. Researchers from an epidemiological cardiology research centre in the US went through the records of 9,498 middle-age adults and found that 45% of all heart attacks were silent. They also found that the silent heart attacks increased the risk of death due to heart disease by 3 times and death from all factors by 34%. They also found that the chance of having a silent heart attack is higher in men but the risk of death is higher in women than men. The study appeared in journal Circulation. Heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart muscle is severely reduced or cut off completely.

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Regular exercise at any age can prevent symptoms of dementia

Exercising regularly any age can protect against Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementias, a University of Kentucky study shows. Researchers enlisted 30 individuals aged between 59 and 69 and put them through fitness assessments, ultrasounds and brain scans tests. The findings showed that flow of blood to critical areas of the brain was higher in participants who were more physically fit. “The study demonstrates that being physically active improves blood flow to the brain and confers some protection from dementia, and conversely that people who live sedentary lifestyles, especially those who are genetically predisposed to Alzheimer’s, might be more susceptible, said lead researcher Nathan Johnson. The study was published in journal NeuroImage.

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Compiled by Abhijit Ahaskar

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