Photo: Priyanka Parashar/Mint
Photo: Priyanka Parashar/Mint

Beans, peas and lentils—the new slimming agents

Listening to loud music can lead to temporary deafness and people with a caring family are more likely to survive cancerstudies and research tips for a healthier you

Eating beans and peas daily can help lose extra weight

Daily intake of beans, peas, lentils or chickpeas can help people lose weight, a Canadian research shows. Researchers from St. Michael’s Institute examined data gathered by 12 earlier studies and found that participants who consumed three-quarters of a cup of beans and lentils every day lost about 0.34 kg more than those who didn’t eat them. Beans are rich sources of antioxidants which help combat cancer and cardiovascular diseases while the fibre in them lowers levels of bad cholesterol in the blood. The study was published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Listening to loud music without earplugs can affect hearing

Attending music concerts without earplugs can lead to temporary hearing loss from loud music, a Dutch study warns. Researchers from University Medical Centre Utrecht enlisted 51 people at an outdoor music festival in Amsterdam and assigned earplugs to half of them while the rest carried on without earplugs. After four-and-a-half hours of the show, the test showed that only 8% of the participants who were wearing earplugs suffered from temporary hearing loss while in the other group about 42% suffered from hearing issues. Previous studies have showed that temporary hearing loss can have long-term effects on the brain and behaviour. The study was published in JAMA Otolaryngology.

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Social support increases survival from cancer

People living in close-knit communities are more likely to survive a cancer diagnosis, a US study suggests. Researchers at the University of California examined a study involving 80,000 people and found that rate of cancer deaths was highest in unmarried men and women. Researchers believe that in some cases it is because the married people are better off than single people but the key factor was the social support that was provide by the presence of a spouse or other family members. The study was published in the journal Cancer.

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Alzheimer’s affects faculty to recognise faces

Alzheimer’s patients struggle to recognise faces not because they can’t remember them but because their faculty to recognize faces is impaired, a Canadian study shows. Researchers from University of Montreal showed photos of faces in upright and upside down position to Alzheimer’s patients and some elderly without Alzheimer’s. The results were same in both groups in upside down faces but in the upright faces, people with Alzheimer’s took more time to identify a face and even then made a lot of mistakes. Researchers feel holistic face recognition is affected in Alzheimer’s and is the reason why they have difficulty in identifying their friends and family. The study was published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

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Making basic healthcare available can save millions of lives every year

Spending less than $5 per person on essential healthcare services such as contraception and proper medication can help save millions of mothers and children every year, a US study claims. Researchers from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health pointed out that 1.5 million newborn deaths, 1.5 million child deaths, and 149,000 maternal deaths can be prevented every year by making basic services available in 74 low and middle-income countries, which accounts for 95% of all global maternal and child deaths. The study was published in The Lancet.

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