It is all about evolution, rather than an outright revolution in case of the Apple iPhone 7.

For the last two years, Apple has followed the tradition of retaining the same design language for its phones (for example, iPhone 6 and 6s). That the same design is now being carried forward for a third successive generation, is unchartered territory.

Yet, the iPhone 7 is decisively an improvement. It remains 7.1mm thick, weighs 138g (5g lighter than the iPhone 6s), and is also water-resistant. The antenna lines on the back panel have been wiped clean. The Space Grey colour option has been dropped, and instead, Black and Jet Black are joining Silver, Gold and Rose Gold. Jet Black is glossy, and tends to catch fingerprints and dust. The matte finish Black variant has a beautiful brushed metal look.

While the screen size and resolution (4.7-inch LED; 1,334x750-pixels) remain the same, iPhone 7’s display is brighter, and can reproduce more colours. This becomes very apparent in a side-by-side comparison with the iPhone 6s—the iPhone 7 screen looks richer and visibility is less impacted by ambient reflections, translating into a more comfortable viewing experience.

The iPhone home button is now no longer clickable. Instead, it is driven by the Taptic Engine—essentially a bunch of pressure sensors and haptic vibration motors that simulate the feel of a button. App developers can also integrate support for haptic feedback in apps and games. Apple is also intent on resetting your finger’s muscle memory. Instead of the swipe left on the screen gesture to unlock the iPhone, iOS 10 replaces that with a double tap of the home key.

The iPhone 7 is powered by the new A10 Fusion chip, with two high-efficiency cores and two performance cores. Depending on the app you are using, the power management automatically switches between them. There will be battery life gains for power users.

The 12-megapixel camera is now driven by a faster f/1.8 lens, optical image stabilization, four-colour True Tone flash for accuracy, and wider colour capture. Overall, the photos are definitely more realistic and accurate than what most Android phones can manage, and certainly an upgrade over the already very competent iPhone 6s.

Of course, the headphone jack is no more. The good old Lightning port, used for charging the device, will now also output audio. Before you get any anxiety issues, Apple is bundling an adapter with the phone, which allows your existing 3.5mm headphones to work with the iPhone 7 as well.

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it"—though it is debatable whether this phrase emerged in the Franklin Roosevelt or the Harry Truman era, Apple has certainly taken inspiration. The iPhone 7 is an improvement in every respect. If you own an iPhone older than the 6s, splurging on this makes perfect sense

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