The app will work on all Android phones and tablets, which have a front facing camera and runs at least the Android 4.3 operating system. (The app will work on all Android phones and tablets, which have a front facing camera and runs at least the Android 4.3 operating system.)
The app will work on all Android phones and tablets, which have a front facing camera and runs at least the Android 4.3 operating system. (The app will work on all Android phones and tablets, which have a front facing camera and runs at least the Android 4.3 operating system.)

Samsung’s cool new app will protect your child’s eyes

Viewing a screen too close can lead to a variety of health issues, and children are particularly vulnerable

New Delhi: Remember the times when as a child you would sit too close to the TV to watch a movie or play a video game? The inevitable result was that your parents would scold you, and tell you that viewing a screen up close may actually damage the eyesight. Fast forward to the present day, and the young crop of this generation has a more high-tech version of the same problem—holding the phones and tablets too close to their eyes. And the parents aren’t always around within earshot, since these are portable devices that a child may move around the home with.

Technology company Samsung recognizes this issue, and has launched a rather interesting app that does the scolding for you, if the child is looking at the screen a tad closer than ideal. The app is called Samsung Safety Screen, and is free to download from the Google Play Store. When running in the background, it monitors the distance of the viewer’s face using the front camera on smartphones and tablets, and has a built-in facial recognition technology. If it detects a face that is too close, it covers up part of the display and a cute animated character pops up on the screen suggesting that the user move further away from the screen. Once the optimal viewing distance is detected, the animation automatically disappears.

This app may come in very handy for a lot of parents, because children tend to not realize how close they are to the smartphone or tablets screen as they remain engrossed with the content, be it a YouTube video, a movie or a game. This leads to brain strain, and something known as the computer vision syndrome—it occurs after the eyes remain focused on a display for a significant period of time, resulting in headaches, blurred vision, neck pain, redness in the eyes, fatigue, dry eyes, double vision and even vertigo or dizziness.

The app will work on all Android phones and tablets, which have a front facing camera and runs at least the Android 4.3 operating system. This app is not yet available for iOS users, which means that iPad totting parents will have to monitor their child’s screen viewing habits the old fashioned way.

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