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Tired of gathering retweets and likes? Feel the urge to move on, away from the walls and timelines littered with nothing but babies and holiday pictures—the social networks which cater to a majority of the populace? If you want something that offers a personal touch, which talks about your interests, head on to networks which cater to your specific tastes.

We have collated a list of the new and awesome online spaces which offer personalized spaces where you can connect with people beyond nosy aunts and public relations (PR) professionals. The best part? All of them are completely free to use. Time to gather your eBags and move on, we say.

Go mobile with colleagues

Muxi (www.muxi.com) is a mobile-only social network for professionals. “Muxi gathers people according to their professional activity," explains Bertrand Besse, CEO and co-founder, Muxi, in an email. Muxi aims to build professional networks. Once you create a Muxi login, the sign-up requires you to add your professional details, and you can’t change the profession (sales and marketing, advertising, teaching, etc.) on your profile. It allows people to connect with others in the same field, while still encouraging more interaction than LinkedIn, which Besse says is for recruiters.

What we like: A very sleek mobile app that lets you connect and collaborate with your professional circle.

What we don’t: The app is iPhone only, with an Android version still in the works.

Started: July

Have a family reunion

Photojima (www.photojima.com) is a collaborative site for photographs. Have a huge family and want to collect all those photographs in an online family album? Get ready to scan those faded pictures which are lying in a dusty corner of your home with Photojima. The site gives you a login and allows you to create an “Island", or a photo album. Once that’s done, you can control and invite who can see that album and who can contribute to it. “We want to bring people together around photos, especially families and friends," mailed Mark Hollas, founder, Photojima. “We want to give people a hub for their photos which they are in control of, so they can show their photo to whoever they want knowing that their privacy is not at risk."

What we like: Excellent privacy measures.

What we don’t: Only 10 pictures can be uploaded in a day through a free account.

Started: June

Do some good

What we like: Very good implementation of the idea, making it easy to connect and make a difference.

What we don’t: The small community and the fact that events and funds aren’t active yet make it limited, for now.

Started: February, with a community of a little over 1,000 members.

Make buddies on travel

My Social Passport (www.mysocial passport.com) is about building local connections—ideally for people who are new to a place. If you travel a lot for work, this network will be very handy. “We have backpackers, students, expats, business travellers, couples, people trekking, people who have recently moved and more," Brennan Basnicki, the Canada-based founder of My Social Passport, says in an email. You can enter a photo, interests and activities, and then put in information about planned trips, and ask around if you are looking for fellow travellers. Otherwise, you can see where other people are going, and leave advice if you can. Basnicki adds, “I am now planning on travelling with a group of people I met through the site!"

What we like: It’s a great way to meet new people with a shared interest in travel.

What we don’t: The newsfeed feels like a copy of Facebook.

Started: January, with users from over 100 countries.

Swish a racket

Different strokes:Tired of Facebook? Try social networking sites with a more personal touch that talk about your interests. Illustration by Raajan/Mint.

You can follow individuals or tribes —groups about sports, muscles or a type of exercise. You can answer questions about your sport, join a tribe or follow people who are doing interesting things. “We’re not short of ideas or places we want to take the product to. However our short-term features will revolve around Challenges and Tribes, as well as improving the training data tracking and analysis for users," says Reid.

What we like: Challenges—users can take challenges and then update their success results, and compare how they do against others.

What we don’t: The site has no way of tracking training data of users.

Started: June 2011; now has around 70,000 members.

For those who like to poke

Qooh.me (www.qooh.me) is all about asking people questions. If weird questions pop into your head every morning about the people you meet or people you want to know more about, this might be the social network for you. “What makes it different is the fact that it’s more personal," mails Vincent Mabuza, the South Africa-based founder of the social network. The fact that you can be anonymous and still connected is making the site very popular. “That’s the biggest factor for its success. You can anonymously ask questions to people you are interested in," says Mabuza.

Once you sign in, you get a profile Web page and a link to it (called Qlink), which you can share with others on other social networks, so they can ask you questions. Without knowing the link, though, you can’t see someone’s profile. Everything everyone posts is for public viewing, but only if you have someone’s Qlink.

What we like: Anonymity. At a time when the Internet is becoming all about using your real name, the fact that this website lets you ask a personal question to someone anonymously is quite cool.

What we don’t: Since it’s anonymous, be prepared for offensive questions. The profiles on the site have been facing a lot of anonymous questions with the intent of being just plain nasty. Simply delete them and move on. Also, till you share your Qlink with friends, or connect it to your other social networks, there’s not much you can do with the social network.

Started: May 2011; now has more than 700,000 members.

Write to us at businessoflife@livemint.com

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