Warp and weft tales

A new book by Jaya Jaitly delves into the ongoing ... more

Cotton turban cloth with zari borders was woven on narrow looms. Photographs courtesy ‘Woven Textiles Of Varanasi’, Niyogi Books.
1/9Cotton turban cloth with zari borders was woven on narrow looms. Photographs courtesy ‘Woven Textiles Of Varanasi’, Niyogi Books.
A model wearing a contemporary Banarasi sari sits among Varanasi weavers and their families.
2/9A model wearing a contemporary Banarasi sari sits among Varanasi weavers and their families.
A bride wearing her grandmother’s pink tissue silk sari(in next slide) for her wedding ceremony in the 1960s.
3/9A bride wearing her grandmother’s pink tissue silk sari(in next slide) for her wedding ceremony in the 1960s.
The sari was woven in the late 19th century.
4/9The sari was woven in the late 19th century.
The typical weaver’s workspace is crowded with looms and pattern cards.
5/9The typical weaver’s workspace is crowded with looms and pattern cards.
A worker in a powerloom factory in Varanasi. Powerlooms work much faster, multiplying production.
6/9A worker in a powerloom factory in Varanasi. Powerlooms work much faster, multiplying production.
Muslim weavers like Kasim continue to create fabric with Tibetan symbols, borders and patterns for Buddhists across the world.
7/9Muslim weavers like Kasim continue to create fabric with Tibetan symbols, borders and patterns for Buddhists across the world.
The paisley, a significant motif in Varanasi’s weaving vocabulary, is arranged in myriad ways by a naqshaband.
8/9The paisley, a significant motif in Varanasi’s weaving vocabulary, is arranged in myriad ways by a naqshaband.
This paisley in Devanagari calligraphy reveals a Kabir bhajan.
9/9This paisley in Devanagari calligraphy reveals a Kabir bhajan.
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