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The terrorist attack on Paris has thrown fresh light on areas such as the part of Brussels called Molenbeek, a neighbourhood where acute desperation has created a breeding ground for potential terrorists.
The terrorist attack on Paris has thrown fresh light on areas such as the part of Brussels called Molenbeek, a neighbourhood where acute desperation has created a breeding ground for potential terrorists.

Ethnic divide

Europe would do well to study one country that has learnt how to manage a melting pot of identities: India

In his provocative book, Reflections on the Revolution in Europe, neoconservative writer Christopher Caldwell noted that the continent became multicultural not as part of a conscious policy, but in a fit of absence of mind. The post-war boom created labour shortages that led to demand for guest workers, who did work the natives looked down upon, as well as kept wage costs low in smokestack industries that were losing ground against competition from Japan.

Few of these immigrant groups were integrated into the mainstream.

The terrorist attack on Paris has thrown fresh light on areas such as the part of Brussels called Molenbeek, a neighbourhood where acute desperation has created a breeding ground for potential terrorists. It is quite possible that ethnic divides in European cities will grow wider in the coming years, just the sort of result the terrorists who attacked Paris must have been hoping for.

Europe would do well to study one country that has learnt how to manage a melting pot of identities: India.

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