This could get the workers of the world to hum a different tune.

Three former Google employees have set up a company that is trying to use artificial intelligence to get people to be happier at work, The New York Times reported. The startup, Humu, uses some of the people-analytics programmes Google had developed. At its core is its “nudge engine" which, the report added, “is based on economist Richard Thaler’s Nobel Prize-winning research into how people often make decisions because of what is easier rather than what is in their best interest and how a well-timed nudge can prompt them to make better choices".

The trick is in going through the client company’s employee surveys to identify the behavioural changes that could bring about greater happiness among employees. While that raises flags on data privacy, Humu says there is little to fear and that it is compliant with strict European data privacy rules. So does it work? It has, in at least one company, which is good news for everybody concerned. After all, a happy worker is a productive worker.

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