Home >Politics >Policy >Street vendors Bill introduced in Lok Sabha
The proposed law seeks to earmark vending zones where hawkers would be allowed to sell their wares and carry out a digitalized photo census and survey of existing vendors. M Zhazo/ HT (The proposed law seeks to earmark vending zones where hawkers would be allowed to sell their wares and carry out a digitalized photo census and survey of existing vendors. M Zhazo/ HT)
The proposed law seeks to earmark vending zones where hawkers would be allowed to sell their wares and carry out a digitalized photo census and survey of existing vendors. M Zhazo/ HT

(The proposed law seeks to earmark vending zones where hawkers would be allowed to sell their wares and carry out a digitalized photo census and survey of existing vendors. M Zhazo/ HT)

Street vendors Bill introduced in Lok Sabha

While street vending without a valid certificate will be barred, certificates that were issued before the legislation is enacted will remain valid

New Delhi: The government on Thursday introduced the Street Vendors Bill in Lok Sabha (LS) —the first attempt in the country to regulate urban street hawkers and spell out their rights.

The proposed law seeks to earmark vending zones where hawkers would be allowed to sell their wares and carry out a digitalized photo census and survey of existing vendors.

The final draft of the Bill, which was taken up by the Sonia Gandhi-led National Advisory Council (NAC) last year, has been criticized by some for incorporating provisions for the eviction of street vendors on seven days’ notice if they fail to comply with the law.

The responsibility for maintaining detailed records of registered street vendors under the Bill will be entrusted to a Town Vending Committee (TVC), at least 40% of whose members will be chosen from among the street vendors, one-third of them women.

Under the Bill, any person above the age of 14 can apply to the TVC for registration as a street vendor, paying a one-time fee. While street vending without a valid certificate will be barred, certificates that were issued before the legislation is enacted will remain valid.

One of the key suggestions of the council included in the Bill is planning for future spaces in new areas.

“Every local authority shall, in consultation with the Planning Authority, once in every five years, make out a plan to promote a supportive environment for the vast mass of urban street vendors to carry out their vocation," the Bill said.

“By and large, it is a progressive central legislation and no doubt it will go on to help the lives of a large number of street vendors in the country," said Ranjit Abhigyan, programme manager at the National Association of Street Vendors of India (NASVI), a collective of hawker organizations.

“However, we resent the provision for eviction. Ideally no eviction should happen, and if under extraordinary situation a relocation needs to be done, then at least three months should be given to the vendor."

The Bill has provisions to impose a fine of as much as 500 a day on street vendors for failing to relocate or face eviction after the expiry of seven days. A street vendor can also be fined as much as 2,000 for breaching provisions of the legislation.

India has 13 million urban street vendors, mainly in the metros and state capitals, according to NASVI.

Subscribe to newsletters
* Enter a valid email
* Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter.

Click here to read the Mint ePaperLivemint.com is now on Telegram. Join Livemint channel in your Telegram and stay updated

Close
×
My Reads Redeem a Gift Card Logout