OPEN APP
Home >Politics >Policy >Dissecting India’s on-going heatwave
A woman walks along the road with her face covered to protect herself from sun stroke on a hot summer day in Chandigarh on 28 May 2015. Photo: Reuters
A woman walks along the road with her face covered to protect herself from sun stroke on a hot summer day in Chandigarh on 28 May 2015. Photo: Reuters

Dissecting India’s on-going heatwave

The annual monsoon is unlikely to hit the southern state of Kerala on 30 May as scheduled, and will instead reach the state by 3 June

New Delhi: The country’s wait for some respite from the ongoing heatwave just got a bit longer, with the monsoon likely to be delayed by a couple of days. The annual monsoon is unlikely to hit the southern state of Kerala on 30 May as scheduled, and will instead reach the state by 3 June.

Though 1 June is considered the normal arrival date for the rains, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) forecast landfall on 30 May, with a four-day margin of error. “It may not happen on 30 May but we don’t expect a delay beyond four days, which is quite normal," said D.S. Pai, the weather department’s lead monsoon forecaster. Read more.

Meanwhile, US-based meteorological service provider AccuWeather has predicted a “significant" drought condition in the country with the monsoon likely to be disrupted by “very active" typhoons (cyclones) over the Pacific, according to a report in The Times of India. It also said the phenomena may negatively impact agriculture all the way from central India to much of Pakistan. Read the detailed report.

The official death toll due to the ongoing weather conditions reached 2,005, according to reports, with Andhra Pradesh bearing the worst brunt. Palamau in Jharkhand recorded 47 degrees Celsius, while the mercury crossed the 47 mark in Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh. Read more. Since 1979, according to data from the ministry of home affairs and IMD, over 13,000 people have died as a result of heat waves. The 2015 heat wave is the deadliest so far.

To deal with those suffering due to intense heat, the Delhi government and several other state governments have advised hospitals, both private and government, to treat heat-stroke patients as emergency cases and make necessary arrangements for ensuring immediate medical treatment. Doctors advise drinking plenty of fluids and avoiding long hours of exposure to hear, adding that the elderly and those with ailments and on medication are more vulnerable. Doctors said any heat stroke patient should not be treated at home and should be brought to the hospital immediately. Read more.

Experts also point out that excessive heat retention in the body can lead to fatal conditions at high temperatures and that after a certain temperature, things get difficult to manage, and need intensive care. A report from The Indian Express tells how a heat stroke can affect your body.

If you are not sure why this year’s heat wave is so intense, here’s what is likely to have caused it. A CNN report says climate change is a major factor. While neighbouring countries like Pakistan and Afghanistan are also facing the heat, India appears to be suffering far worse.

Subscribe to Mint Newsletters
* Enter a valid email
* Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter.

Click here to read the Mint ePaperMint is now on Telegram. Join Mint channel in your Telegram and stay updated with the latest business news.

Close
×
Edit Profile
My Reads Redeem a Gift Card Logout