New Delhi: Economic inclusiveness and controlling high rates of migration are two steps that are needed to address concerns of those who feel left behind in the era of globalisation, said former prime minister of the United Kingdom David Cameron on Saturday.

“This is not the end of globalisation. We need to do better for people left behind by globalisation. We have to make a major course correction to address concerns of people," said Cameron while addressing the Hindustan Times Leadership Summit on ‘The Western World in Crisis?’

He stated while globalisation has been a massive success some people feel left behind by the pace of change and thus leaders need to do better at addressing those people especially economic inclusiveness.

“For too long there was a sense that the rising tide will raise all the boats, but that hasn’t happened. I believe parties are fully capable of taking those course corrections ... making sure there are genuine opportunities for everyone. If that happens globalisation would continue," he added.

Another phenomenon, Cameron said, is the cultural effect due to high levels of migration and that needs to be addressed with as much as vigour as economic questions.

He said he thinks people of UK supports a multi-ethnic and multi-racial UK but have a perfectly rational argument against high levels of migration.

“We can be open and attractive but demonstrate control at the same time. You can control immigration and still make it attractive for global visitors," he added.

On India’s demonetisation plan, Cameron said he doesn’t want to get involved in India’s domestic politics but what India needs to do is, “get a grip on corruption, move more people to banking, move fast forward to digital economy and grow tax base (to fund infrastructure)".

The former UK PM, who stepped down earlier this year when UK decided to exit European Union after a referendum, voiced support for idea of referendums to decide major issues.

“The role of a referendum is not to supplant parliament but to decide on bigger issues. India and Britain are both representative democracies. We shouldn’t use referendums for issues discussed in Parliament," said Cameron.

On lighter note, Cameron during his remarks said England may need to kidnap India’s cricketing legend Sachin Tendulkar for England cricket team who is having a tough time during its ongoing India tour.

On what next for him, Cameron said, “I am writing a book about my time in politics and keep up my interest in development... It’s time to pass the baton on to my wife."

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