New Delhi: Road accidents accounted for 23,468 accidents, with 611 deaths in Mumbai in 2015, the most accidents in any city in India and almost triple the 8,085 in the Delhi, the next highest. The national capital saw 1,622 road deaths. The report collected data for 50 cities with population more than 1 million, in which 111,024 accidents and 16,513 deaths were reported.

The number of road accidents in India rose to 501,423 in 2015 from 489,400 in the previous year, showed the Road Accidents in India 2015 report released on Thursday by the transport ministry. A total of 146,133 people died in road accidents in 2015, up from 139,671 in 2014.

Road accidents killed an average of 216 people in the 15-34 age group every day in 2015, accounting for 54.1% of all deaths on roads, government data showed.

Releasing the report, transport minister Nitin Gadkari said, “I’m ashamed to say that despite several measures being taken by the government, the accidents and fatalities in the country are rising. There is an urgent need for people to learn responsible driving in the country." He added that his ministry is already working to amend laws on vehicular safety and penalties for violators.

The report said around 1,374 accidents and 400 deaths occurred every day on Indian roads which translates into about 57 accidents and 17 deaths per hour.

According to the report, drunken driving constituted only 4.6% of road accidents.

The most accidents happened between 3pm and 6pm, the report said. 60% of all accidents happened in the daytime.

Driver’s fault was the reason for the most road accidents, deaths and injuries on all roads in the country. Driver’s faults accounted for 77.1% of total road accidents during 2015, as against 78.8% in 2014. Within the category of driver’s faults, road accidents caused and persons killed due to over-speeding by drivers accounted for 62.2% of accidents and 61.1% of deaths.

Union road secretary Sanjay Mitra said India needs to see road accidents as a public health concern. With so many youths dying, it’s high time Indians turn vigilant on roads and change their driving habits, he said.

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