Let’s admit it. Content on our social media timelines does not always warrant a positive reaction. Perhaps you have had to like a post that wasn’t “like-worthy" because, well, it was from a friend or family member.

But what if your reaction to a post was recorded in real time?

Polygram is an Artificial Intelligence-powered social network that records your facial expressions in real time through a device’s front-facing camera. The live emojis in the app reflect the user’s facial expression. So if a post makes you smile, the corresponding live emoji will do exactly that.

Basically, users can react to a post with their facial expression, without clicking any buttons. They can also see how others reacted to their post, through emojis that smile, laugh, or look shocked.

Polygram also breaks down the type of interest people show in a post. With statistics such as average view time, gender distribution of your audience and its location, the app goes into the minutest of details. The live filters in it, similar to Snapchat, were not that appealing. But the live emojis were accurate, responding to facial expressions correctly all the time.

Another interesting feature in Polygram is “wipe-to-reveal", which adds a layer of privacy control to disappearing images. Snapchat users get a prompt if the other user takes a screenshot of a disappearing snap. In Polygram, however, if you send a picture to another user, they get it with a filter that looks like fog. When you start wiping the screen, you can see the image. The fog-like filter then reappears, meaning only a part of the image is revealed at a time, so a user cannot take a screenshot. Polygram is currently available on iOS for free, with no update on an Android version.

Facial expressions are fast becoming an important part of the facial-recognition technology domain. Recently, Alipay, the mobile and online payment platform, launched a facial-recognition payments system. According to a post on Alizila, the news hub for the Alibaba Group, the “Smile to Pay" service allows users to authenticate payments through a combination of facial scanning and mobile number. This service was introduced on 1 September at a new KFC healthy-food concept restaurant in Hangzhou.

In November, Facebook had acquired FacioMetrics, an emotion-detection start-up, prompting rumours that the social networking giant could introduce facial gesture controls in the future.

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