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New Delhi: GE Power India Limited (GEPIL) and its affiliates in consortium with NGSL have completed the steam turbine renovation and modernization project at NTPC’s Ramagundam, Super Thermal Power Station.

“The steam turbine upgrade project supported NTPC’s Ramagundam Power Plant Unit 1 and 3 with average 9.9% improvement in turbine heat rate, turbine life extension by 20 years and average +3.8% points improvement in thermal efficiency of both the units," GEPIL said in a release on Wednesday.

The upgraded units will support 2.12 lakhs metric ton per year potential annual savings in coal consumption for the power plant. “The project reduces 2.34 lakhs metric ton/year CO2 emissions for the area and is aligned with the government’s aim of Net Zero 2070," GEPIL added.

The combined additional 20 MW output generated from both units will provide electricity to approximately 44,100 Indian houses. The reduction in CO2 emissions is equivalent to 141,200 cars taken off the roads.

“Some parts of the project requirements were fulfilled locally from India, including LP turbine manufacturing, supply by the GE facility in Sanand, Gujarat and sourcing of critical auxiliary components from various vendors in India. This supports the ‘Make in India’ initiative by the government," GEPIL said.

“I am very proud of the team who delivered over and above the agreed results to the customer. This project supports the decarbonization story of India with solutions aided by more efficient and flexible power generation solutions. Upgrade projects like these are aimed at increasing power, efficiency and reliability while also reducing emissions and will better position the country to meet future energy demands," said Prashant Jain, RGM - GE Steam Power and MD - GE Power India Limited.

In 2017, GE Steam Power completed a first-of-its-kind Steam Turbine shaft line retrofit for Ukai thermal power station for BHEL 200-MW-class units in India. It was aimed at increasing power, efficiency, and reliability while also reducing emissions. The retrofit extended the unit’s life by 25 years, and restored its output back to the original capacity of 200 MW.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Swati Luthra

Swati Luthra writes on climate change, water, environment and forest issues for Mint. A graduate in Psychology, Swati has been mapping India’s policy initiatives to help meet the pledges made at CoP-26 including achieving net-zero carbon emissions by 2070.
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