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Home / Companies / News /  Johnson & Johnson says covid-19 booster vaccine triggers surge in anti-bodies

A booster dose of Johnson & Johnson's coronavirus vaccine significantly increases levels of antibodies, interim data from two early-stage trials show, the company said on Wednesday. It further added, the second dose of the single-dose vaccine results in binding antibody levels nine times higher than the levels 28 days after people received their first dose. 

Several countries, including the United States, have already begun offering booster doses. 

The company in a release said, in anticipation of the potential need for boosters, the Company conducted two Phase 1/2a studies in individuals previously vaccinated with its single-shot vaccine. New interim data from these studies demonstrate that a booster dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine generated a rapid and robust increase in spike-binding antibodies, nine-fold higher than 28 days after the primary single-dose vaccination. 

Significant increases in binding antibody responses were observed in participants between ages 18 and 55, and in those 65 years and older who received a lower booster dose. The study summaries were submitted to medRxiv on August 24, the release also said.

“We have established that a single shot of our COVID-19 vaccine generates strong and robust immune responses that are durable and persistent through eight months. With these new data, we also see that a booster dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine further increases antibody responses among study participants who had previously received our vaccine," said Mathai Mammen, M.D., Ph.D., Global Head, Janssen Research & Development, Johnson & Johnson. 

“We look forward to discussing with public health officials a potential strategy for our Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, boosting eight months or longer after the primary single-dose vaccination."

The Company is engaging with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), European Medicines Agency (EMA) and other health authorities regarding boosting with the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. Johnson & Johnson continues to diligently generate and evaluate data from ongoing trials as well as emerging real-world evidence, the release also said. 

Earlier, several  scientists had observed that people who got the J&J shot would need boosters.

One study by a team from New York University found a "significant fraction" of blood samples from recipients who got the J&J shot had low neutralizing antibodies against Delta and several other coronavirus variants. 

(With inputs from agencies)

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