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Zerodha CEO Nithin Kamath took Twitter to share some advice with students who wish to go abroad. He has said that whenever students ask him for advice, he asks them to stay in the country as it will most likely have the best opportunities in future.

He also clarified that the advice is not because we need to avoid the brain drain or that there's an obligation to the country.

Sharing his views on Twitter, he cited a blog post by Shruti Rajagopalan who is an Economist at Mercatus Center at George Mason University.

He wrote, “Whenever students ask me for advice, I say, stay in India. Not just because we need to avoid the brain drain or that there's an obligation to the country, but because India will most likely have the best opportunities in future."

In another tweet, he explained as Why is this a smart thing to do?

Explaining from the report, he wrote, “Globally, one in five people below 25 is from India. 47% of Indians, about 650 million, are below the age of 25. This group of young Indians has some unique characteristics."

“Educated digital natives with global ambitions," he added.

Also Read: SIP vs Mercedes: What Zerodha CEO Nithin Kamath has to say

Shruti Rajagopalan's blogpost which was shared by Kamath said that said that next half-century will be about Indians. In the blogpost titled ‘Why everyone should pay more attention to India’, Rajagopalan wrote, “I am betting my program (and my career) on my belief that the next half-century will be about Indians. And it is not for the usual reasons - scale, civilization and history, nuclear power, G-20, etc., but because of the changing demographics."

Also Read: ‘Zerodha wouldn't have happened if not for…’: See Nithin Kamath’s post

In her post, she wrote, “Globally, one in five people below 25 is from India. 47% of Indians, about 650 million, are below the age of 25. This group of young Indians has some unique characteristics."

Explaining the characteristics, she added that the young people have grown up in a market economy, post-command-and-control socialism. “Two-thirds of these Indians were born after the 1991 big bang reforms and have not experienced rationing and long lines for essential goods," she wrote in her blogpost.

Further adding, she wrote that these young Indians have lived in the country that has averaged about 6 percent annual growth for three decades. They have access to global goods and content, and they want and expect to compete with the world.

As per Rajagopalan, a large proportion of the young Indians have grown up with access to the internet and they also have some exposure to English as compared to their parents and grandparents.

Another difference, Rajagopalan pointed out is India’s growing number of entrepreneurs and the vibrant startup culture. She said as compared to the previous generation, the new class of entrepreneurs are much more willing to risk their time and capital instead of accepting a “safe and steady" job.

However, some users did not agree with this analysis.

Commenting on Kamath's post, one user wrote, “Yes, India has the brightest future. But, the taxpayers here are not respected. Govt is continuously increasing the tax. We barely earn money to feed our family and invest what's left, not to give almost everything away to the govt. I won't think twice before moving abroad." Some other wrote, “If given a chance now to move abroad without hassles, half of India would move out. I assure you of the results. In fact i haven't come across a single NRI who is willing to take part in India's bright future as you claim it to be."

Another wrote, “All these things are nice on paper , As a person who has worked in both abroad and India , For same growth , pay and respect ,you would have to work double hard in India and there is always some one readily available to replace you."

Some other wrote, “Stayed in India first 25 years of my life in rented properties owned by folks in the US/Europe. Went out of the country, now own 5 properties. Go out of India to earn wealth if you are middle class or do not have generational wealth." Another user commented, “Data is one thing & implementation is another. What we do for Indian youth to let them stay is pivotal else this can backfire."

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