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In the move for education, many flock to Andhra

  • A previous piece on work-related migration showed that Indians were flocking to major metros
  • Of the 14 districts in Andhra Pradesh, 10 feature in the top 30 districts of India where people migrated to for educational reasons

As many as 5.45 million Indians had moved from their district of birth to another district in the pursuit of education, according to Census 2011. This is an increase of 62% over the 2001 figure of 3.36 million. Here’s where they moved to.

1) Is there a metro bias in education migration?

A previous piece on work-related migration showed that Indians were flocking to major metros. In contrast, education-related migration does not show a dominant movement to metros only. There are 13 districts where the number of people who moved for education-related reasons exceeded 50,000. Of these, only three districts make up a major metro: Bengaluru, Pune and Mumbai Suburban, the first two being the only districts to which more than 100,000 people migrated. Beyond them, Chennai is ranked 27, Kolkata 91 and the count for all nine Delhi districts is less than that of Pune.

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(Graphic: Paras Jain/Mint)

2) Why does Andhra Pradesh stand out?

Of the 14 districts in Andhra Pradesh, 10 feature in the top 30 districts of India where people migrated to for educational reasons. With 70,000-75,000 migrants each, four of its districts are in the top 10 itself, namely Sri Potti Sriramulu Nellore, Krishna, Guntur and Visakhapatnam. Telangana, carved out of Andhra Pradesh in 2014, also makes its presence felt, with the migrant count in the Rangareddy district next only to that of Bengaluru and Pune. Of all migrants moving for education, 13% are in Maharashtra. Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka are the others with a share of such migrants above 10%.

3) Is moving for education an urban phenomenon?

Not entirely. Of the 62% who migrated for education to urban areas, about half moved from rural areas. Another 31% moved from one rural area to another and 7% went from urban to rural areas.

4) Which age groups are the most dominant?

About 81% of migrants who moved for education were in the 10-29 age group: 25% were between 10 and 14 years; 33% were aged 15-19. Another 18% were in the 20-24 age bracket. Much of the Andhra movement is happening in the 10-19 years band. But it has a low share of such migrants staying on for 10 years or more. This points to poor education facilities in home districts. It also indicates that the districts they moved to are unable to absorb them in the workforce, forcing them to move again. Such migrants stay on in many metros.

5) Do as many women migrate as men?

No. For every three males who migrated, only two females did so. Female migration was seen mostly in the age groups before college: 62% of those who migrated did so before the age of 19, against 54% of males. As the age goes up, fewer females migrate for education. Bengaluru and Pune are preferred destinations for migrants of both genders. But Mumbai Suburban, the fourth-most preferred destination for male migrants, figures only at 23rd for females.

Howindialives.com is a database and search engine for public data.

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