HRD minister Ramesh Pokhriyal Nishank. (Pradeep Gaur/Mint)
HRD minister Ramesh Pokhriyal Nishank. (Pradeep Gaur/Mint)

UGC seeks suggestions on possibility of making Hindi compulsory at UG level

  • Universities are autonomous bodies and any decision to teach any particular subject is under their control, says HRD minister Ramesh Pokhriyal
  • Centre in June had revised the draft NEP to curb an uproar in southern states over a proposal for a three-language formula for schools—English, Hindi and a regional mother tongue in non-Hindi speaking states

NEW DELHI : Notwithstanding the controversy around compulsory learning of Hindi in schools in the draft National Education Policy, the University Grants Commission (UGC) has sought suggestions from universities on whether Hindi can be a compulsory subject at undergraduate level.

In response to a question in the Rajya Sabha on whether it is a fact that the “UGC is pushing for making Hindi a compulsory subject in all the UG courses all across the country", the human resource development minister Ramesh Pokhriyal Nishank made the matter public Thursday.

“The University Grants Commission (UGC) has informed that a reference was made to the Universities to seek their opinion/suggestions regarding teaching of Hindi. However, Universities are autonomous bodies and any decision to teach any particular subject is under their control," the minister told the house in a written reply without further elaborating on the subject.

The Union government in June had revised the draft New Education Policy to curb an uproar in southern states over a proposal for a three-language formula for schools—English, Hindi and a regional mother tongue in non-Hindi speaking states.

The original draft prepared by a committee headed by space scientist K.Kasturirangan had mentioned that the study of languages by students “in the non-Hindi speaking states would include the regional language, Hindi and English."

The revised draft dropped Hindi from the section called “flexibility in the choice of languages" and does away with phrases like “non-Hindi speaking states".


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