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The study also finds that out of those lucky enough to find work, a majority fall back on the services sector in underpaid jobs. (Ramesh Pathania/Mint)
The study also finds that out of those lucky enough to find work, a majority fall back on the services sector in underpaid jobs. (Ramesh Pathania/Mint)

Vocational training doesn’t guarantee a job

Unemployment is rising among the vocationally and technically trained. And of those who find work, most end up in low-pay jobs in the service sector, finds a study By

Millions of youth in India opt for technical or vocational training. Such education can be in fields such as agriculture, engineering or medicine, or even leather, automobiles or beauty services. But unemployment appears to be rising among those with vocational and technical training, shows a study of job patterns over the past two decades.

The paper, published in the Indian Journal of Labour Economics, is written by academics Satinder Singh, J.K. Parida and I.C. Awasthi. The study also finds that out of those lucky enough to find work, a majority fall back on the services sector in underpaid jobs.

The study finds that India had 11 million technically and vocationally trained people in the labour force in 2004-05, out of whom 9.6 million, or 85%, were employed. By 2017-18, the number of trained people more than doubled to 22.5 million, but the number of those employed dropped to 9.5 million, or 42%.

Moreover, of those employed, around two thirds—63% of those with vocational training and 67% of those with technical training—were working in the services sector, many in a low-pay, informal setting, the authors say.

One way the situation could be remedied, says the paper, is by updating the training offered by various institutes. For example, many of the skills the youth are being trained in are of no use to employers as they have machines to do such work. The youth need to be trained for roles that actually exist, the paper says.

Another suggestion is for the government to promote the growth of micro and small industries. Once they scale up and become medium-sized enterprises, they can also generate more jobs for people, the authors say.

Also read: “Employability and Earning Differentials Among Technically and Vocationally Trained Youth in India"

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