A still of 'Godzilla: King of the Monsters'.
A still of 'Godzilla: King of the Monsters'.

Film review: 'Godzilla: King of the Monsters' leans on disaster movie clichés

  • 'Godzilla 2' is the latest in Legendary' Monsterverse series
  • Michael Dougherty’s film pits Godzilla against other Titans

They made the first one in 2014, and you asked why, and then they went ahead and made another one, and it'll make you scream, Why!

Godzilla: King of the Monsters comes with the unoriginal tag line "one king to rule them all", a lazy and force-fitted hat-tip to Lord of the Rings.

Michael Dougherty’s sci-fi action adventure is a breathless series of action pieces and elaborate special effects building up to a possible apocalypse. The story opens a few years after the earlier film. Emma (Vera Farmiga) and Mark (Kyle Chandler) are estranged, dealing with the loss of their son Andrew in the last movie. Caught somewhere between their angst is their daughter, Madison (Millie Bobby Brown). Emma works for Monarch, a corporation that monitors and protects Godzilla and the other Titans. To this end, Emma has developed a machine that is able to control their behaviour through bioacoustics.

But eco-warrior Jonah Alan (Charles Dance) has his own greater plan and that’s when things begin to go terribly bad. Emma and Madison are captured and Mark is enlisted to help track them down.

Eventually a whole lot of monsters are stomping around Earth, reducing it to rubble. A three-headed creature is commandeering the dormant Titans (monsters) but can he outwit Godzilla, aka Gojira? Or will Godzilla show that co-existence is possible and save the planet from annihilation? The WWE of monsters is almost fun, but then the humans, with their trite lines, spoil the (limited) drama.

Ken Watanabe, Sally Hawkins and Zhang Ziyi also appear. A third part is inevitable, as Godzilla goes head-to-head with King Kong in "Godzilla vs. Kong". Godzilla 2 might have worked as a B-grade creature feature or a contemporary comic homage to such films, but it is neither. It's just a big-budget waste of resources that weakly attempts some eco-warrior gibberish and leans heavily on disaster movie clichés.

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