Endangered in Assam

“This will melt your heart," tweeted Indian Forest Service officer Parveen Kasvan on 17 July, with a video of the floating heads of three deer, neck deep in an expanse of water. “90% of Kaziranga (National Park) is underwater now. Disaster happens for wildlife also," he added. Assam State Disaster Management Authority officials disclosed that 32 of Assam’s 33 districts have been hit by floods this year. The park, home to the world’s largest population of Indian one-horned rhinoceroses, has seen the wildlife toll this monsoon season go up to more than 50 (including five rhinos and an elephant) so far.—AB

Hashtag your style

Twitter usually makes news for trolls and toxic tweets, but it’s in the limelight for sartorial reasons this week. Hundreds of users have been posting photographs of themselves to #sareetwitter. In fact, Indianwear is having a moment on Twitter, with users posting photographs with hashtags like #kurtatwitter and #veshtitwitter. There is even a #khakitwitter doing the rounds, with posts from Indian police officers and their families. Not everyone is thrilled with these viral hashtags, but the Twitterati is notoriously hard to please and the photographs add some sartorial cheer on our timelines, which otherwise look rather bleak.—SD

Feeling the blues

New Zealand discovered a new level of heartbreak when the World Cup final‘s Super Over ended with scores tied, and England were declared winners on the basis of boundaries scored. Fans furiously debated the deflection-overthrow rule and players called for a revision of the Super Over tie rule, with another Super Over, a “super ball", or a joint-winner declaration—for most people, both these teams were winners in any case.—UB

A respite for the coast

The Bombay high court has quashed Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) clearances for the municipal corporation of Greater Mumbai’s (MCGM’s) 14,000 crore Coastal Road project, saying there was a “serious lacuna" in the decision-making process. This comes as a respite to fishermen’s cooperatives, citizens and environmentalists who have opposed the project on the grounds of massive environmental damage, a reshaping of the coastline, and loss of livelihoods.—DK

A case for coriander

A combination of drought and heavy rains has hit the coriander crop and led to its scarcity, especially across Maharashtra and Karnataka. In the past week, prices of coriander in Mumbai and Bengaluru have risen from 20 to 100 for a 250g bunch. Now might be a good time to finally grow your own coriander or just freeze your existing stock for that special occasion garnish.—DK

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