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Used sporadically in pre-covid times, the term “doomscrolling" has become instantly relatable in a year dominated by the pandemic and Trump tweets. And now it has won the seal of approval of New Zealand, The Guardian reported. Voters chose it from a long list of words, many of which came into existence during the year. “Bubble" took second spot in the survey by the Public Address website, ahead of #NZHellhole, a social media label that came a day after outgoing US President Donald Trump said in August that New Zealand’s latest covid community outbreak was out of control, despite data proving otherwise.

China scrambles to find workers

China’s manufacturing recovery has soared past expectations, so much so that factories are now struggling to fill a shortage of blue-collar workers
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China’s manufacturing recovery has soared past expectations, so much so that factories are now struggling to fill a shortage of blue-collar workers

China’s manufacturing recovery has soared past expectations, so much so that factories are now struggling to fill a shortage of blue-collar workers, Reuters reported. Its output of industrial robots, computer equipment, and integrated circuits has roared back from its coronavirus paralysis. Much of the manufacturing boom has come from foreign demand, with export growth topping expectations for eight of the last nine months. The remarkable turnaround comes as China has mostly eradicated the virus and contrasts with the sluggish comebacks seen in major industrialised peers, where factories are still struggling with pandemic disruptions and the hit to demand. China’s global export share increased to over 13% in the second and third quarters from 11% last year, according to Nomura, the highest for any quarter since at least 2006 when the investment bank started compiling the data.

Musk tweet sends Dogecoin soaring

What started off as a meme-inspired parody cryptocurrency has now become the centre of a series of tweets in a bitcoin sound-off from Elon Musk
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What started off as a meme-inspired parody cryptocurrency has now become the centre of a series of tweets in a bitcoin sound-off from Elon Musk

What started off as a meme-inspired parody cryptocurrency has now become the centre of a series of tweets in a bitcoin sound-off from Elon Musk. The Tesla chief executive officer tweeted some bitcoin banter on Sunday, included calling bitcoin BS. He shouted out Dogecoin in a tweet saying, “One Word: Doge." The tweet sent shares of Dogecoin up nearly 20% and landed it on the list of trending Twitter topics. The tech billionaire even went as far as updating his Twitter bio with the title “Former CEO of Dogecoin." Musk’s Twitter antics come as the dominant cryptocurrency surged to all-time highs during the coronavirus pandemic. This isn’t the first time Musk has tweeted about Dogecoin. He mentioned the digital coin in July when he tweeted “It’s inevitable" with an image depicting the dogecoin standard engulfing the global financial system. The tweet sent shares up 14% at the time.

Sweden fights EU climate move

Sweden is fighting a draft European climate measure that it says could harm its world-beating green bond market
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Sweden is fighting a draft European climate measure that it says could harm its world-beating green bond market

Sweden is fighting a draft European climate measure that it says could harm its world-beating green bond market, Bloomberg reported. The European Commission, which wants to steer investors to socially and environmentally sustainable assets, is proposing that only buildings certified as super-energy efficient by national authorities be included in its taxonomy. Being excluded would make financing more expensive. But national energy requirements differ and since Sweden imposes some of Europe’s toughest, the EU’s framework would ultimately dramatically shrink the pool of Swedish assets that could be funded with green bonds. The Swedish Bankers’ Association says the fallout could leave just 1% eligible, compared with 20% in other countries.

EU-UK trade talks stumble over fish

Boris Johnson’s office said that the EU is 'continuing to make demands that are incompatible with our independence. We cannot accept a deal that doesn’t leave us in control of our own laws or waters
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Boris Johnson’s office said that the EU is 'continuing to make demands that are incompatible with our independence. We cannot accept a deal that doesn’t leave us in control of our own laws or waters

With yet another Brexit deadline disappearing in the rearview mirror, a breakthrough on fishing rights remained elusive for the European Union and Britain on Sunday—leaving both without a trade agreement that would dull the cutting edge of a chaotic, costly economic break on New Year’s Day, AP reported. With hundreds of thousands of jobs at stake throughout the economy, the tiny sector of fisheries continued to drive a wedge between the 27-nation bloc and the UK. Britain left the bloc in January, but a 11-month economic transition period ends on 31 December. “We continue to work hard," EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier said in a statement. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s office said that the EU is “continuing to make demands that are incompatible with our independence. We cannot accept a deal that doesn’t leave us in control of our own laws or waters."

Denmark will dig up millions of mink

Denmark is set to dig up millions of mink that were culled because of a mutated form of coronavirus
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Denmark is set to dig up millions of mink that were culled because of a mutated form of coronavirus

Denmark is set to dig up millions of mink that were culled because of a mutated form of coronavirus, BBC reported. About four million mink will be exhumed from mass graves and incinerated to prevent pollution. It is set to happen in May, when officials say the risk of coronavirus contamination from the dead animals will have passed. More than 15 million mink have been culled in Denmark, devastating its fur industry. Some of the mink buried in mass graves in a military area in the west of the country have resurfaced because of the nitrogen and phosphorus gases produced by their decay. The two burial sites are highly controversial, as one is near a bathing lake and the other not far from a source of drinking water. Residents have complained about the potential risk of contamination. The ministry of food and agriculture said that the government had gained support in parliament to dig up the mink next year.

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