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F1 racer Lewis Hamilton’s bid for a record-equalling 91st career Formula One win took a huge hit at the Russian Grand Prix on Sunday after stewards imposed two five-second penalties for practice start infringements. Stewards had notified the Mercedes driver, who was on pole at Sochi, before the start that he was under investigation. Hamilton pitted after 17 laps and dropped from the lead to 11th place. Hamilton is one victory away from matching the all-time win record of Ferrari great Michael Schumacher. For the rest of the world and national news, here’s Mint Lite.

Ayodhya real estate high in demand

Availability of land is limited and the cost ranges between  <span class='webrupee'>₹</span>2,000 and  <span class='webrupee'>₹</span>3,000 per square feet
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Availability of land is limited and the cost ranges between 2,000 and 3,000 per square feet

Since the foundation stone-laying ceremony of the Ram Mandir in Ayodhya a month ago, real estate prices in the Uttar Pradesh city have doubled. Property prices went up by 30-40% after the Supreme Court in November paved the way for the temple construction at the disputed site, where a mosque stood before it was demolished in 1992 by kar sevaks who claimed an ancient Ram temple stood at the same site. And the prices have doubled now since the bhoomi pujan ceremony by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on 5 August, reports PTI. What has further contributed to the rise is limited availability of real estate as the government plans to acquire land for infra projects befitting an international tourist destination, said people aware of property-related developments. They said, in the heart of the town, availability of land is limited and the cost ranges

TikTok attacks Donald Trump ban

ByteDance is fighting the Trump administration in court even as it pursues its approval for the sale of a stake in its US operations to Oracle and Walmart
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ByteDance is fighting the Trump administration in court even as it pursues its approval for the sale of a stake in its US operations to Oracle and Walmart

Hours before TikTok was removed from US app stores from midnight on Sunday, a lawyer for the popular video-sharing app told a federal judge that Donald Trump’s impending ban was irrational given that its Chinese owner, Bytedance, was in talks to strike a deal the president himself had demanded, reports Bloomberg. “How does it make sense to impose this app-store ban tonight when there are negotiations underway that might make it unnecessary?" attorney John Hall asked at a Sunday morning hearing on TikTok’s request to temporarily block the ban. ByteDance is fighting the Trump administration in court even as it pursues its approval for the sale of a stake in its US operations to Oracle and Walmart. Trump has called for bans on both TikTok and WeChat, arguing the Chinese apps could give China’s government access to millions of Americans’ personal data.

Most displaced people in India

Disaster’s effect on people
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Disaster’s effect on people

Disasters such as cyclones and flooding displace the highest number people in India every year, an average of 3.6 million people a year since 2008. In the first six months of 2020, 2.67 million people have been displaced by disasters such as Cyclone Amphan, the most in the world (see chart), according to Geneva’s Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre. Last year, there were five million new disaster displacements in India, the highest figure in the world. It was the result of increasing disasters and high levels of social and economic vulnerability. In the first half of 2020, cyclo-nes Amphan and Nisarga displaced the most people worldwide. Communal violence, particularly in Delhi after the adoption of CAA, triggered the majority of new conflict displacements in the first half of 2020.

If not covid, climate change will kill

At the 75th UN General Assembly, world leaders are taking the long view, warning that if covid-19 doesn’t kill us, climate change will
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At the 75th UN General Assembly, world leaders are taking the long view, warning that if covid-19 doesn’t kill us, climate change will

At the 75th UN General Assembly, world leaders are taking the long view, warning that if covid-19 doesn’t kill us, climate change will. Leaders of countries from Indonesia to Palau have warned that rising seas that will have a greater impact than the virus. Fiji’s Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama described US wildfires and high temperatures in Siberia as “environmental Armageddon". The islands of Palau and Tuvalu are virus-free yet both have seen hundreds affected by climate change. Tuvalu’s PM Kausea Natano, who delivered his UN speech via video against a vista of turquoise waters and swaying fronds, said the island is free of the virus but is still recovering from a pair of tropical cyclones. Such storms are likely to worsen as the planet warms. Agriculture has become harder to sustain due to rising sea levels and the pandemic’s effect on movement of goods exposed food insecurity in island nations this year.

Estee Lauder’s doing shoot in space

Cosmetics multinational Estee Lauder is sending its newest skincare formula into space on Tuesday for a photo shoot, and it’s costing them less than it would to sign to mega influencer
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Cosmetics multinational Estee Lauder is sending its newest skincare formula into space on Tuesday for a photo shoot, and it’s costing them less than it would to sign to mega influencer

Cosmetics multinational Estee Lauder is sending its newest skincare formula into space on Tuesday for a photo shoot, and it’s costing them less than it would to sign to mega influencer. It is paying NASA $128,000 to fly 10 bottles of skin serum to the International Space Station. Kim Kardashian West earns between $300,000-500,000 per Instagram post. Once there, astronauts will take photos of the formula in the cupola control tower, which has panoramic views of the cosmos. The images will be used on social media, with the firm planning to auction one bottle for charity when the items return to Earth this spring. The Estee Lauder tie-up is part of NASA’s effort to commercialize low-earth orbit and make it a domain where private enterprise eventually does business as routinely as the government conducts spacewalks. NASA also hopes to bolster space tourism by selling trips to the ISS to private customers.

Curated by Shalini Umachandran and Pooja Singh. Have something to share with us? Write to us at businessoflife@livemint.com or tweet to @shalinimb

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