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Hollywood veteran Tom Hanks believes movie theatres will “absolutely" sail through the coronavirus pandemic. In an interview with Collider, Hanks addressed the impact of covid on cinema halls which led to the release of many anticipated titles on various streaming platforms. Hanks calls the shift to digital medium a “due" change, The Press Trust of India reported. Hanks, whose latest big screen release is News of the World, believes theatres will always be the go-to option for big budget franchises, like the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Johnson ‘sold out’ fish in Brexit deal

British fishermen have said that PM Johnson had sold out fish stocks to the EU with a Brexit trade deal that gives EU boats significant access to the UK’s rich fishing waters
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British fishermen have said that PM Johnson had sold out fish stocks to the EU with a Brexit trade deal that gives EU boats significant access to the UK’s rich fishing waters

British fishermen have said that Prime Minister Boris Johnson had sold out fish stocks to the European Union with a Brexit trade deal that gives EU boats significant access to the United Kingdom’s rich fishing waters, Reuters reported. Some British politicians also said the deal added up to a sell-out. The United Kingdom will leave the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy on 31 December, but under the trade deal agreed on Christmas Eve the current rules will remain largely in place during a 5-1/2-year transition period. After that period, there will be annual consultations to establish the level and conditions for EU access to British waters. The National Federation of Fishermen’s Organisations said the fishing industry had been sacrificed by Johnson. For example, it said, the UK’s share of Celtic Sea haddock will increase to 20% from 10%, leaving 80% in the hands of EU fleets for a further five years.

Plan for the euro was a ‘rush of blood’

Margaret Thatcher branded the European commission’s plans for a single currency as a 'rush of blood to the head'
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Margaret Thatcher branded the European commission’s plans for a single currency as a 'rush of blood to the head'

Margaret Thatcher branded the European commission’s plans for a single currency as a “rush of blood to the head", according to 30-year-old documents released from the Irish government archives. In an echo of the divisive political debate that ultimately led to Brexit, the then British prime minister hit out at the “politburo" in Brussels and vowed not to be dictated to, during talks with her then Irish counterpart, according to The Guardian. The Tory leader likened giving away powers of taxation to gifting sovereignty to Europe, the archives from 1990 show. The Irish government note recorded that Thatcher said: “In talking of a single currency, [Jacques] Delors must have had a rush of blood to the head. “We are not going to have a single currency." Jacques Delors was European commission president at the time and an advocate of deeper integration.

A post-exposure antibody trial

Ten people have been given antibodies as a form of emergency protection after being exposed to coronavirus, in the first trial of its kind
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Ten people have been given antibodies as a form of emergency protection after being exposed to coronavirus, in the first trial of its kind

Ten people have been given antibodies as a form of emergency protection after being exposed to coronavirus, in the first trial of its kind. The experimental jab is being offered to people who have been in close contact with a confirmed covid case within the past eight days, BBC reported. If it proves effective, it could protect vulnerable people who have not yet been, or cannot be, vaccinated. And it could help to contain outbreaks. The trial, run at University College London Hospitals NHS Trust, is looking at whether an injection of two different antibodies could prevent someone who has been exposed to covid from developing the disease. Vaccines take weeks to offer full protection, meaning it’s too late for them to be given once someone already has the virus.

A bitcoin mining boost in the Nordic

The Nordic region once again has become a lucrative place to mine crypto-currencies, thanks to a plunge in electricity prices.
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The Nordic region once again has become a lucrative place to mine crypto-currencies, thanks to a plunge in electricity prices.

The Nordic region once again has become a lucrative place to mine crypto-currencies, thanks to a plunge in electricity prices. The wettest weather in at least 20 years boosted production from hydro-electric plants, leaving Sweden and Norway with some of the lowest power prices in the world, Bloomberg reported. The resulting glut in the most important raw material for making the virtual coins coincided with a year when the price of bitcoin tripled. The currencies are made in giant computer farms that process complex algorithms in halls as big as airport hangers. That makes electricity one of the key inputs. The current market dynamics give big miners alternatives to places where bitcoins are usually created such as China, Kazakhstan and Canada. Their luck follows several years of poor margins from higher electricity costs and lower prices for most virtual currencies.

French sleuths to join Ghosn probe

A team of French investigators will come to Beirut next month to participate in interrogating former Renault-Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn
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A team of French investigators will come to Beirut next month to participate in interrogating former Renault-Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn

A team of French investigators will come to Beirut next month to participate in interrogating former Renault-Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn, a Lebanese justice ministry official said. The official gave no specific date or details of what information the investigators would seek from Ghosn, AP reported. Former auto executive Ghosn, who is a Lebanese, Brazilian and French national, fled Japan in a dramatic escape that drew headlines last year, arriving in Lebanon on 30 December 2019. In addition to his trial in Japan, the 66-year-old businessman is facing a number of legal challenges in France, including tax evasion and alleged money laundering, fraud and misuse of company assets while at the helm of the Renault-Nissan alliance. The Lebanese official, speaking on condition of anonymity in line with regulations, said the French investigators would be working alongside their Lebanese counterparts.

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