Active Stocks
Wed Apr 24 2024 15:59:54
  1. Tata Steel share price
  2. 165.50 2.73%
  1. NTPC share price
  2. 351.25 1.25%
  1. Power Grid Corporation Of India share price
  2. 290.00 1.75%
  1. Infosys share price
  2. 1,431.85 -0.68%
  1. ITC share price
  2. 428.85 -0.08%
Business News/ News / India/  Yamuna Overflows: Why is there a flood-like situation in Delhi when it hasn't rained in days; Explained
BackBack

Yamuna Overflows: Why is there a flood-like situation in Delhi when it hasn't rained in days; Explained

Delhi is facing a severe flood situation as the water level in the Yamuna river continues to rise above the danger mark. Heavy rainfall and increased discharge of water from Haryana's Hathnikund barrage are the main factors behind the flooding.

New Delhi: Vehicle move through a flooded road near the Red Fort as the swollen Yamuna river floods low-lying areas, in New Delhi, Thursday, July 13, 2023. The torrential Yamuna in Delhi swelled to a staggering 208.48 metres Thursday morning, inundating nearby streets and public and private infrastructure, and causing immense hardships to people living in close proximity to the river. (PTI Photo/Kamal Kishore) (PTI07_13_2023_000040B) (PTI)Premium
New Delhi: Vehicle move through a flooded road near the Red Fort as the swollen Yamuna river floods low-lying areas, in New Delhi, Thursday, July 13, 2023. The torrential Yamuna in Delhi swelled to a staggering 208.48 metres Thursday morning, inundating nearby streets and public and private infrastructure, and causing immense hardships to people living in close proximity to the river. (PTI Photo/Kamal Kishore) (PTI07_13_2023_000040B) (PTI)

Delhi has been witnessing an uprecedented rising in Yamuna's water level over the last three days. The water level in Yamuna rose up from 203.14 metre on Sunday to 205.4 metres on Monday going past the danger mark of 205.33 metres. Reportedly, water level rose to 208.48 metres on Thursday morning and Central Water Commission has termed it as an ‘extreme situation’.

Also Read: Delhi flood news LIVE updates

Delhi Lt Governor VK Saxena has called a meeting of Delhi Disaster Management Authority (DDMA) on Thursday to discuss the flood situation in the city while CM Kejriwal has urged Union Home Minister Amit Shah that water from Hathnikund barrage in Haryana be released in a slow and pointed out manner to prevent flooding in the national capital. 

Furthermore, Kejriwal on Thursday informed that rising Yamuna levels have led to the water treatment plants at Wazirabad, Chandrwal and Okhla to be shut and it could lead to a water supply issue in some areas.

Why is Delhi facing flood-like situation? 

The highly unusual flood-like situation in Delhi can be attributed to two major factors i.e. increased rainfall in the national captial and surrounding areas and increased discharge of water from Haryana's Hathnikund barrage.

According to CWC, the flow rate from the Hathnikund barrage remained 1.5 cusecs above the normal level at night. The normal flow rate from the barrage is 352 cusecs but heavy rainfall led to increased discharge. One cusec is equivalent to 28.32 litres per second.

Meanwhile, Delhi saw the highest rainfall in a single day in the month of July since 1982. The national capital received 153mm rainfall in the 24 hours ending 8:30 am on Sunday which was followed by 107mm rainfall in the next 24 hours. 

Principal director of the Natural Heritage Division at the Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage Manu Bhatnagar blamed heavy rainfall in a short period of time as the primary reason for the rising water level in Yamuna. 

"The same amount of water falling over a longer period of time would not lead to such a situation as it allows time for the water to pass through. Even a lesser amount of precipitation can result in a higher level downstream if it falls in a shorter period of time," Bhatnagar told news agency PTI.

Bhim Singh Rawat, associate coordinator of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers, People (SANDRP) blamed the rising Yamuna water level due to significant silt accumulation. 

"More than 20 bridges within the 22-kilometre river stretch from Wazirabad to Okhla obstruct the flow, leading to the deposition of silt in the riverbed and the formation of numerous mid-stream sandbars," Rawat noted. 

 

 

Unlock a world of Benefits! From insightful newsletters to real-time stock tracking, breaking news and a personalized newsfeed – it's all here, just a click away! Login Now!

Catch all the Business News, Market News, Breaking News Events and Latest News Updates on Live Mint. Download The Mint News App to get Daily Market Updates.
More Less
Published: 13 Jul 2023, 11:58 AM IST
Next Story footLogo
Recommended For You